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emblica_officinalis

Amalaki, org (1/2 lb.)

Item Number : 6812 Price: $9.95 Quantity :

USDA Organic

Certified Organic Amalaki fruit powder (Emblica officinalis)

A traditional rejuvenative used to cleanse and nourish the bodily tissues. Balancing for all doshas, especially pitta.*

   * Removes excess pitta from the system*
   * Assists natural internal cleansing and maintains regularity*
   * Stimulates digestive fire without aggravating pitta*
   * Natural antioxidant*

Ayurvedic Energetics:

   * Rasa (taste): sour, sweet, pungent, bitter, astringent
   * Virya (action): cooling
   * Vipaka (post-digestive effect): sweet
   * Doshas (constitutions): Balancing for all doshas, especially pitta.

Commentary: As one of the three ingredients in Triphala, Amalaki is a potent rejuvenative that nourishes the tissues and gently removes toxins. It is generally taken in place of Triphala by those with excess heat in the digestive tract. Amalaki's cooling action removes excess pitta from the GI tract, supporting a healthy stomach lining and the proper function of digestive acids. It also cleanses the colon, eliminating excess toxins and heat while supporting healthy bowel movements. Amalaki is a highly concentrated source of antioxidants and is deeply nourishing to the body tissues. It promotes healthy eyes, bones, blood, teeth, hair and nails, while supporting the proper function of the liver, spleen, pancreas, heart and lungs.*

For a 1 lb bag click here For five lbs or more in bulk click here

Herbal tablets that contain Amalaki include: Amalaki, Healthy Hair, Heart Formula, Immune Support, Joint Support, Kidney Formula, Liver Formula, Lung Formula, Mens Support, Para Cleanse, Pitta Digest, Stress Ease, Sweet Ease, Trim Support, Triphala

Other products that contain Amalaki include: Amalaki&Almond soap, Chyavanprash, Joint Balm, Triphala powder, and Trim Balm

This product is organically grown and processed in accordance with the USDA's National Organic Program (NOP).

For more information on Amalaki visit:

Herbs for life: Amalaki monograph

http://www.herbsforlife.co.uk/monograph.asp?h=10&p=m&t=d

Wikipedia's entry for Amalaki

Search index page description Banyan Botanicals Amalaki fruit powder is USDA certified organic, sustainably sourced, and fairly traded. Amalaki is also known as Amla (Hindi), Dhatri (Sanksrit), Nelli (Sinhalese) and Indian Gooseberry (English). The botanical name of Amalaki is Emblica officinalis which is also synonymous with Phyllanthus emblica. Amalaki powder is available in ½ lb and 1 lb bags and in bulk bags of 5 lbs or more. Amalaki herb is a key ingredient in our Amalaki herbal tablets,Chyavanprash,Triphala herb powder and USDA Organic Triphala tablets.

http://www.banyanbotanicals.com/prodinfo.asp?number=6812&variation=&aitem=1&mitem=125

Amalaki

Botanical names: Emblica officinalis, Phyllanthus emblica, Euphorbiaceae

Other names: Dhatri, ‘nurse’ (S), Amlika (H), Nelli (T), Indian Gooseberry (E)

Amalaki, ‘sour’ Botany: Amalaki is a small to medium-sized tree with a crooked trunk and spreading branches, the grayish-green bark peeling off in flakes. The branchlets are glabrous or finely pubescent, 10-20 cm long, usually deciduous; the leaves simple, subsessile and closely set along branchlets, light green, resembling pinnate leaves. The flowers are greenish-yellow, borne in axillary fascicles, giving way to a globose fruit with a greenish-yellow flesh and six furrows, enclosing a stone with six seeds. Amalaki is native to tropical southeastern Asia, particularly in central and southern India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Malayasia, southern China and the Mas carene Islands. It is commonly cultivated in gardens throughout India and grown commercially as a medicinal fruit (Warrier et al 1995, 256; Kirtikar and Basu 1935, 2220-21).

Part used: Fresh or dried whole fruit.

Dravyaguna:

   *
     Rasa: primarily amla, tikta and kashaya, but also madhura, noticed particularly while drinking water after one has consumed the fruit. Katu is a minor, secondary taste, whereas lavana is absent.
   *
     Vipaka: madhura
   *
     Virya: shita
   *
     Karma: dipanapachana, anuloma, jvaraghna, raktaprasadana, kasahara, svasahara, hrdaya, chakshushya, romasanjana, jivaniya, medhya, rasayana, tridoshaghna
   *
     Prabhava: Amalaki is sattvic, bringing good fortune, love and longevity to those that consume it (Srikanthamurthy 2001, 164; Warrier et al 1995, 256; Dash 1991, 9; Dash and Junius 1983, 89; Frawley and Lad 1986, 157).

Constituents: Amalaki fruit contains significantly high amounts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C), as well as the diterpenes referred to as the gibberellins, the triterpene lupeol, flavonoids (e.g. kaempherol-3-O-ß-Dglucoside, quercetin-3-O-ß-Dglucoside), and polyphenols (e.g. emblicanin A and B, punigluconin and pedunculagin). Also present are the phyllantine and zeatin alkaloids, and a number of benzenoids including amlaic acid, corilagin, ellagic acid, 3-6-di-O-galloyl-glucose, ethyl gallate, 1,6-di-O-galloyl-ß-Dglucose, 1-di-O-galloyl-ß-Dglucose, putranjivain A, digallic acid, phyllemblic acid, emblicol, and alactaric acid (Yoganarasimhan 2000, 410; Bhattacharya 1999; Summanen 1999).

Medical research:

Adaptogen: Like many of the rasayana botanicals, E. officinalis displays pronounced adaptogenic properties, and has been shown to be active in vivo against free radical damage induced during stress (Rege 1999). Although E. officinalis is one the highest naturally occuring sources of vitamin C (Katiyar 1997, 178), its antioxidant properties have also been attributed to the tannoid complexes (emblicanin A (37%), emblicanin B (33%), punigluconin (12%) and pedunculagin (14%) (Bhattacharya 1999).

Antiinflammatory: An extract of the leaf of E. officinalis has been found to have significant antiinflammatory activities in carrageenan- and dextran-induced rat hind paw oedema (Asmawi 1993).

Antimicrobial: Aqueous and ethanol extracts of E. officinalis have been found to be both antifungal and antimicrobial in vitro, without any indication of cellular toxicity (Dutta 1998; Ahmad 1998).

Antiviral: A bioassay-guided fractionation of a methanol extract of the fruit of Emblica officinalis (putranjivain A) was isolated as a potent inhibitory substance on the effects of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase (el-Mekkawy et al 1995).

Cancer: Nandi et al. report that the supplementation E. officinalis to mice in vivo significantly reduced the cytotoxic effects of a known carcinogen, 3,4-benzo(a)pyrene, in much smaller doses than the carcingogen (1997). When an aqueous extract of E. officinalis is administered prior to radiation treatment, it has been found to have a protective effect upon radiation induced chromosomal damage (Yadav 1987).

Cardiovascular: The lipid lowering and antiatherosclerotic effects of Emblica officinalis fresh juice, given in doses equal to 5 mL/kg over a 60 day period, was evaluated in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipid and LDL levels were lowered by 82%, 66%, 77% and 90%, respectively. Tissue lipid levels showed a significant reduction following E. officinalis juice administration, with the regression of aortic plaques and increased excretion of cholesterol and phospholipids, compared to controls (Mathur et al 1996). Researchers studied the effect of Emblica officinalis in normal and hypercholesterolaemic men aged 35-55 years to determine its effect on total serum cholesterol. The supplement was given for a period of 28 days in the raw form. Both normal and hypercholesterolemic subjects showed a decrease in cholesterol levels while taking Amalaki, but two weeks after withdrawing the supplement the total serum cholesterol levels of the hypercholesterolemic subjects rose almost to initial levels (Jacob et al 1988). Emblica officinalis was found to reduce serum cholesterol, aortic cholesterol and hepatic cholesterol in rabbits, but did not influence euglobulin clot lysis time, platelet adhesiveness or serum triglyceride levels (Thakur 1985). The effect of Amalaki on serum cholesterol was investigated in rabbits. After a standard laboratory diet the rabbits were fed a combination of cholesterol and clarified butter, and were divided into three groups: one which served as a control, the second which were also given 10 mg of vitamin C daily, and one group that were given 1 g of Amalaki daily. Mean serum cholesterol levels in all three groups rose to significantly higher levels by the end of the second week, and continued to rise by the end of the third and fourth weeks except in those animals given Amalaki, which demonstrated significantly lower mean serum cholesterol levels (Mishra et al 1981).

Digestive: Research conducted at the Amala Cancer Research Centre in Kerala, India, has found that an extract of E. officinalis significantly inhibited hepatocarcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) in experimental animals (Jeena 1999). In addition to its hepatoprotective activities, E. officinalis also appears to be functional in acute necrotizing pancreatitis, reducing inflammation and the damage to acinar cells (Thorat 1995).

Immune: E. officinalis has been found to enhance natural killer cell activity and antibody dependent cytotoxicity in tumor bearing mice, enhancing lifespan to 35% beyond the control animals (Suresh and Vasudevan 1994). An aqueous extract of E. officinalis has been shown to significantly reduce the cytotoxic effects of sodium arsenite when administered orally in experiemental animals (Biswas 1999).

Toxicity: No data found. Amalaki is widely consumed throughout India as a medicinal food.

Indications: Dyspepsia, gastritis, biliousness, hyperacidity, hepatitis, constipation, flatulent colic, colitis, hemorrhoids, convalescence from fever, cough, asthma, skin diseases, bleeding disorders, menorrhagia, anemia, diabetes, gout, osteoporosis, premature graying, alopecia, asthenia, mental disorders, vertigo, palpitations, cardiovascular disease, cancer.

Contraindications: Acute diarrhea, dysentery (Frawley and Lad 1986, 157).

Medicinal uses: Amalaki is among the most important medicinal plants in the Ayurvedic materia medica, and along with Haritaki and Vibhitaki forms the famous Triphala formula, used to cleanse the dhatus of ama, pacify all three doshas, and act as a rasayana to promote good health and long life. A synonym for Amalaki is Dhatri or ‘nurse,’ indicating that it has the power to restore health like a mother caring for her child. The fruit is the most commonly used plant part, and the fresh fruit is preferred. An excision in the unripe fruit is made and the exudate collected is used topically in conjunctivitis (Kirtikar and Basu 1935, 2221). The unripe fruits are also made into pickles and given before meals to stimulate the appetite in anorexia (Nadkarni 1954, 481). The fresh juice of the fruit mixed with ghrita is a rasayana, has a beneficial activity upon the intestinal flora, and is a corrective to colon function. The fresh fruit is very hard to come by outside of the subcontinent, and can usually be found in Indian markets for only a few weeks during the fall. The dried fruit is used as a decoction to treat ophthalmia when applied externally, and is used internally as a hemostatic and antidiarrheal (Nadkarni 1954, 482). The boiled, reconstituted dried fruit, blended into a smooth liquid with a small quantity of gur added, is useful in anorexia, anemia, biliousness dyspepsia, and jaundice. This is also an excellent restorative in chronic rhinitis and fever, with swollen and dry red lips and rashes about the mouth. The dried fruit prepared as a decoction and taken on a regular basis is useful in menorrhagia and leucorrhea, and is an excellent post-partum restorative. Similarly the Chakradatta recommends the fresh juice of Amalaki with Amalaki churna, taken with ghee and honey as a vajikarana rasayana. In the treatment of cardiovascular disease Amalaki is an excellent antioxidant botanical, used to treat all of the cardiovascular effects of poorly controlled diabetes and insulin resistance, including diseases of microcirculation such as macular degeneration. Amalaki is similarly taken in polluted urban areas to keep the immune system strong. For coronary heart disease in particular Amalaki can be combined with Arjuna, or non-Indian botanicals such as Hawthorn, and with Guggulu for dyslipidemia. Taken with Guduchi, Katuka, and Bhunimba, Amalaki forms an important protocol in the treatment of hepatitis and cirrhosis. Amalaki is also an important herb to consider to protect the body against the deleterious effects of chemotherapy and radiation in conventional cancer treatments. In combination with Chitraka, Haritaki, Pippali and saindhava, Amalaki churna is mentioned by the Sharangadhara samhita in the treatment of all types of fever (Srikanthamurthy 1984, 85). In the treatment of nausea, vomiting and poor appetite fresh Amalaki is crushed with Draksha (Vitis vinifera) and mixed with sugar and honey (Sharma 2002, 170). Amalaki fruit fried in ghee and reduced to a paste and mixed with kanjika (fermented rice water) is applied over the head to treat nosebleeds (Srikanthamurthy 1984, 242). In the treatment of agnimandya, edema, abdominal enlargement, hemorrhoids, intestinal parasites, diabetes and allergies three parts Amalaki churna is mixed with the same amount each of Ajamoda, Haritaki and Maricha (Piper nigrum), with 1 part pancha lavana (the ‘five salts,’ i.e. saindhava, samudra, sambara, sauvarchala and vid lavana), macerated in buttermilk until it has fermented (Sharma 2002, 71). Combined with equal parts Guduchi, Shunthi (Zingiber officinalis), Aragvadha (Cassia fistula) and Gokshura, dried Amalaki fruit is recommended by the Chakradatta as a decoction in the treatment of urinary tenesmus (Sharma 2002, 307). Amalaki is the primary constituent of a complex polyherbal lehya called Chyavanaprash that is used as a rasayana, and in the treatment of chronic lung and heart diseases, infertility and mental disorders (Sharma 2002, 140). Another valued rasayana that contains Amalaki as the primary constituent is Brahma rasayana, giving the person that takes it “…the vigor resembling an elephant, intelligence, strength, wisdom and right attitude (Srikanthamurthy 1995, 386). The dried fruit made into an oil and applied to the head, and taken internally as a decoction or powder, is reputed to be useful in alopecia and adds luster and strength to the hair. Similarly, the Chakradatta recommends a nasya of equal parts Amalaki and Madhuka (Glycyrrhiza glabra), decocted in milk, in the treatment of alopecia (Sharma 2002, 488). Both the fresh juice and crushed seeds are combined with Haridra as an effective treatment for diabetes (Sharma 2002, 327; Dash and Junius 1983, 90). The seeds are made into a fine powder and mixed with equal parts powder of Ashvagandha root as a rasayana in the cold winter months (Nadkarni 1954, 482-3). For scabies and skin irritations the seed is charred, powdered and mixed into sesame oil and applied externally (Nadkarni 1954, 482).

Dosage:

• Churna: 3-10 g b.i.d.-t.i.d. • Kvatha: 1:4, 60-120 mL b.i.d.-t.i.d. • Tincture: 1:3, 30% alcohol, 1-10 mL b.i.d.-t.i.d.

http://www.toddcaldecott.com/index.php/herbs/learning-herbs/397-amalaki

'Amla' literally means 'sour'; another name for amalaki is dhatri. dhatri means 'mother' or 'nurse', indicating that amalaki is the ultimate carer and healer. It is the major ingredient in Chyavanprash, the elixir tonic paste that is a superb rejuvenative for the lungs, all three doshas and the reproductive system. Use amalaki for reducing inflammation in the digestive tract, assisting the bowels and strengthening the heart.

Pole, p. 126

Sanskrit Name: Amalaki (आँवला) syn: shriphala, dhatrika (nurse), amrita (ambrosia), shita, gayatrei, vrishya, rocani, tishyaphala, pancarasa, vayastha (retaining youth), shiva (beneficial to all nature)

Common Name: indian gooseberry

Botanical Name: Phyllanthus emblica, syn. Emblica officinalis

Search MedLine (PubMed) for Emblica officinalis: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Search&db=PubMed&term=Emblica%20officinalis

Euphorbiaceae: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbiaceae (sour juice of plant; sold in shops / of service to man)

Parts Used: fruit, nut, seed, leaves, root, bark, flowers

Guna (Qualities): laghu - light, ruksha - dry, shita - cool sara - spreading

The twenty gunas or qualities of all substances are: Guru (heavy) Manda (dull) Shita (cold) Ushna (hot) Snigdha (unctuous) Slaksna (smooth) Sandra (dense) Mridu (soft) Sthira (stable) Suksma (subtle) Visada (non-slimy) Laghu (light) Tikshna (sharp) Rooksha (un-unctuous, dry) Khara (rough) Drava (liquid) Kathina (hard) Sara (unstable) Sthula (gross) Piccila (slimy)

Brief Botanical Description: small to medium sized tree growing throughout India up to 4500’

Constituents: Fe, Ca, Mg, silica, B12, C. K = fruit pulp contains moisture 81%, protein .5%, fat .1%, mineral matter .7%, fiber 3.4%, carbohydrates 14%, calcium .05%, and potassium .02%, iron 1/2mg/100g. nicotinic acid.2mg/100g and vitamin C 600mg/100g.Fruit is high in pectin, phyllemblin is there. Fresh amla contains about 20 times more vitamin C than orange juice and equal in antiscorbutic value to 1-2 oranges. Dried fruit have tannins and 3-4 colloidal complexes. Other components are phyllemblic acid, lipids, gallic acid, emblicol, mucic acid, ellagic acid, glucose. Seeds contain a fixed oil, phosphatides, some essential oil with linolenic, linoleic, oleic, stearic, palmitic, myristic acids. Proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes are in seeds.

Ayurvedic Institute, Herbal Database, 1997

Michael Dick, Ayurvedic Herbology Handbook, 2002: Rev. 5/8/2004: p. 15

Fair Use

Amalaki

Botanical names: Emblica officinalis, Phyllanthus emblica, Euphorbiaceae

Other names: Dhatri, ‘nurse’ (S), Amlika (H), Nelli (T), Indian Gooseberry (E)

Amalaki, ‘sour’ Botany: Amalaki is a small to medium-sized tree with a crooked trunk and spreading branches, the grayish-green bark peeling off in flakes. The branchlets are glabrous or finely pubescent, 10-20 cm long, usually deciduous; the leaves simple, subsessile and closely set along branchlets, light green, resembling pinnate leaves. The flowers are greenish-yellow, borne in axillary fascicles, giving way to a globose fruit with a greenish-yellow flesh and six furrows, enclosing a stone with six seeds. Amalaki is native to tropical southeastern Asia, particularly in central and southern India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Malayasia, southern China and the Mas carene Islands. It is commonly cultivated in gardens throughout India and grown commercially as a medicinal fruit (Warrier et al 1995, 256; Kirtikar and Basu 1935, 2220-21).

Part used: Fresh or dried whole fruit.

Dravyaguna:

   Rasa: primarily amla, tikta and kashaya, but also madhura, noticed particularly while drinking water after one has consumed the fruit. Katu is a minor, secondary taste, whereas lavana is absent.
   Vipaka: madhura
   Virya: shita
   Karma: dipanapachana, anuloma, jvaraghna, raktaprasadana, kasahara, svasahara, hrdaya, chakshushya, romasanjana, jivaniya, medhya, rasayana, tridoshaghna
   Prabhava: Amalaki is sattvic, bringing good fortune, love and longevity to those that consume it (Srikanthamurthy 2001, 164; Warrier et al 1995, 256; Dash 1991, 9; Dash and Junius 1983, 89; Frawley and Lad 1986, 157).

Constituents: Amalaki fruit contains significantly high amounts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C), as well as the diterpenes referred to as the gibberellins, the triterpene lupeol, flavonoids (e.g. kaempherol-3-O-ß-Dglucoside, quercetin-3-O-ß-Dglucoside), and polyphenols (e.g. emblicanin A and B, punigluconin and pedunculagin). Also present are the phyllantine and zeatin alkaloids, and a number of benzenoids including amlaic acid, corilagin, ellagic acid, 3-6-di-O-galloyl-glucose, ethyl gallate, 1,6-di-O-galloyl-ß-Dglucose, 1-di-O-galloyl-ß-Dglucose, putranjivain A, digallic acid, phyllemblic acid, emblicol, and alactaric acid (Yoganarasimhan 2000, 410; Bhattacharya 1999; Summanen 1999).

Medical research:

Adaptogen: Like many of the rasayana botanicals, E. officinalis displays pronounced adaptogenic properties, and has been shown to be active in vivo against free radical damage induced during stress (Rege 1999). Although E. officinalis is one the highest naturally occuring sources of vitamin C (Katiyar 1997, 178), its antioxidant properties have also been attributed to the tannoid complexes (emblicanin A (37%), emblicanin B (33%), punigluconin (12%) and pedunculagin (14%) (Bhattacharya 1999).

Antiinflammatory: An extract of the leaf of E. officinalis has been found to have significant antiinflammatory activities in carrageenan- and dextran-induced rat hind paw oedema (Asmawi 1993).

Antimicrobial: Aqueous and ethanol extracts of E. officinalis have been found to be both antifungal and antimicrobial in vitro, without any indication of cellular toxicity (Dutta 1998; Ahmad 1998).

Antiviral: A bioassay-guided fractionation of a methanol extract of the fruit of Emblica officinalis (putranjivain A) was isolated as a potent inhibitory substance on the effects of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase (el-Mekkawy et al 1995).

Cancer: Nandi et al. report that the supplementation E. officinalis to mice in vivo significantly reduced the cytotoxic effects of a known carcinogen, 3,4-benzo(a)pyrene, in much smaller doses than the carcingogen (1997). When an aqueous extract of E. officinalis is administered prior to radiation treatment, it has been found to have a protective effect upon radiation induced chromosomal damage (Yadav 1987).

Cardiovascular: The lipid lowering and antiatherosclerotic effects of Emblica officinalis fresh juice, given in doses equal to 5 mL/kg over a 60 day period, was evaluated in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipid and LDL levels were lowered by 82%, 66%, 77% and 90%, respectively. Tissue lipid levels showed a significant reduction following E. officinalis juice administration, with the regression of aortic plaques and increased excretion of cholesterol and phospholipids, compared to controls (Mathur et al 1996). Researchers studied the effect of Emblica officinalis in normal and hypercholesterolaemic men aged 35-55 years to determine its effect on total serum cholesterol. The supplement was given for a period of 28 days in the raw form. Both normal and hypercholesterolemic subjects showed a decrease in cholesterol levels while taking Amalaki, but two weeks after withdrawing the supplement the total serum cholesterol levels of the hypercholesterolemic subjects rose almost to initial levels (Jacob et al 1988). Emblica officinalis was found to reduce serum cholesterol, aortic cholesterol and hepatic cholesterol in rabbits, but did not influence euglobulin clot lysis time, platelet adhesiveness or serum triglyceride levels (Thakur 1985). The effect of Amalaki on serum cholesterol was investigated in rabbits. After a standard laboratory diet the rabbits were fed a combination of cholesterol and clarified butter, and were divided into three groups: one which served as a control, the second which were also given 10 mg of vitamin C daily, and one group that were given 1 g of Amalaki daily. Mean serum cholesterol levels in all three groups rose to significantly higher levels by the end of the second week, and continued to rise by the end of the third and fourth weeks except in those animals given Amalaki, which demonstrated significantly lower mean serum cholesterol levels (Mishra et al 1981).

Digestive: Research conducted at the Amala Cancer Research Centre in Kerala, India, has found that an extract of E. officinalis significantly inhibited hepatocarcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) in experimental animals (Jeena 1999). In addition to its hepatoprotective activities, E. officinalis also appears to be functional in acute necrotizing pancreatitis, reducing inflammation and the damage to acinar cells (Thorat 1995).

Immune: E. officinalis has been found to enhance natural killer cell activity and antibody dependent cytotoxicity in tumor bearing mice, enhancing lifespan to 35% beyond the control animals (Suresh and Vasudevan 1994). An aqueous extract of E. officinalis has been shown to significantly reduce the cytotoxic effects of sodium arsenite when administered orally in experiemental animals (Biswas 1999).

Toxicity: No data found. Amalaki is widely consumed throughout India as a medicinal food.

Indications: Dyspepsia, gastritis, biliousness, hyperacidity, hepatitis, constipation, flatulent colic, colitis, hemorrhoids, convalescence from fever, cough, asthma, skin diseases, bleeding disorders, menorrhagia, anemia, diabetes, gout, osteoporosis, premature graying, alopecia, asthenia, mental disorders, vertigo, palpitations, cardiovascular disease, cancer.

Contraindications: Acute diarrhea, dysentery (Frawley and Lad 1986, 157).

Medicinal uses: Amalaki is among the most important medicinal plants in the Ayurvedic materia medica, and along with Haritaki and Vibhitaki forms the famous Triphala formula, used to cleanse the dhatus of ama, pacify all three doshas, and act as a rasayana to promote good health and long life. A synonym for Amalaki is Dhatri or ‘nurse,’ indicating that it has the power to restore health like a mother caring for her child. The fruit is the most commonly used plant part, and the fresh fruit is preferred. An excision in the unripe fruit is made and the exudate collected is used topically in conjunctivitis (Kirtikar and Basu 1935, 2221). The unripe fruits are also made into pickles and given before meals to stimulate the appetite in anorexia (Nadkarni 1954, 481). The fresh juice of the fruit mixed with ghrita is a rasayana, has a beneficial activity upon the intestinal flora, and is a corrective to colon function. The fresh fruit is very hard to come by outside of the subcontinent, and can usually be found in Indian markets for only a few weeks during the fall. The dried fruit is used as a decoction to treat ophthalmia when applied externally, and is used internally as a hemostatic and antidiarrheal (Nadkarni 1954, 482). The boiled, reconstituted dried fruit, blended into a smooth liquid with a small quantity of gur added, is useful in anorexia, anemia, biliousness dyspepsia, and jaundice. This is also an excellent restorative in chronic rhinitis and fever, with swollen and dry red lips and rashes about the mouth. The dried fruit prepared as a decoction and taken on a regular basis is useful in menorrhagia and leucorrhea, and is an excellent post-partum restorative. Similarly the Chakradatta recommends the fresh juice of Amalaki with Amalaki churna, taken with ghee and honey as a vajikarana rasayana. In the treatment of cardiovascular disease Amalaki is an excellent antioxidant botanical, used to treat all of the cardiovascular effects of poorly controlled diabetes and insulin resistance, including diseases of microcirculation such as macular degeneration. Amalaki is similarly taken in polluted urban areas to keep the immune system strong. For coronary heart disease in particular Amalaki can be combined with Arjuna, or non-Indian botanicals such as Hawthorn, and with Guggulu for dyslipidemia. Taken with Guduchi, Katuka, and Bhunimba, Amalaki forms an important protocol in the treatment of hepatitis and cirrhosis. Amalaki is also an important herb to consider to protect the body against the deleterious effects of chemotherapy and radiation in conventional cancer treatments. In combination with Chitraka, Haritaki, Pippali and saindhava, Amalaki churna is mentioned by the Sharangadhara samhita in the treatment of all types of fever (Srikanthamurthy 1984, 85). In the treatment of nausea, vomiting and poor appetite fresh Amalaki is crushed with Draksha (Vitis vinifera) and mixed with sugar and honey (Sharma 2002, 170). Amalaki fruit fried in ghee and reduced to a paste and mixed with kanjika (fermented rice water) is applied over the head to treat nosebleeds (Srikanthamurthy 1984, 242). In the treatment of agnimandya, edema, abdominal enlargement, hemorrhoids, intestinal parasites, diabetes and allergies three parts Amalaki churna is mixed with the same amount each of Ajamoda, Haritaki and Maricha (Piper nigrum), with 1 part pancha lavana (the ‘five salts,’ i.e. saindhava, samudra, sambara, sauvarchala and vid lavana), macerated in buttermilk until it has fermented (Sharma 2002, 71). Combined with equal parts Guduchi, Shunthi (Zingiber officinalis), Aragvadha (Cassia fistula) and Gokshura, dried Amalaki fruit is recommended by the Chakradatta as a decoction in the treatment of urinary tenesmus (Sharma 2002, 307). Amalaki is the primary constituent of a complex polyherbal lehya called Chyavanaprash that is used as a rasayana, and in the treatment of chronic lung and heart diseases, infertility and mental disorders (Sharma 2002, 140). Another valued rasayana that contains Amalaki as the primary constituent is Brahma rasayana, giving the person that takes it “…the vigor resembling an elephant, intelligence, strength, wisdom and right attitude (Srikanthamurthy 1995, 386). The dried fruit made into an oil and applied to the head, and taken internally as a decoction or powder, is reputed to be useful in alopecia and adds luster and strength to the hair. Similarly, the Chakradatta recommends a nasya of equal parts Amalaki and Madhuka (Glycyrrhiza glabra), decocted in milk, in the treatment of alopecia (Sharma 2002, 488). Both the fresh juice and crushed seeds are combined with Haridra as an effective treatment for diabetes (Sharma 2002, 327; Dash and Junius 1983, 90). The seeds are made into a fine powder and mixed with equal parts powder of Ashvagandha root as a rasayana in the cold winter months (Nadkarni 1954, 482-3). For scabies and skin irritations the seed is charred, powdered and mixed into sesame oil and applied externally (Nadkarni 1954, 482).

Dosage:

• Churna: 3-10 g b.i.d.-t.i.d. • Kvatha: 1:4, 60-120 mL b.i.d.-t.i.d. • Tincture: 1:3, 30% alcohol, 1-10 mL b.i.d.-t.i.d.

Fair Use Source: http://www.toddcaldecott.com/index.php/herbs/learning-herbs/397-amalaki


Sanskrit Name: Amalaki synonyms: shriphala, dhatrika (nurse), amrita (ambrosia), shita, gayatrei, vrishya, rocani, tishyaphala, pancarasa, vayastha (retaining youth), shiva (beneficial to all nature)

Common Name: indian gooseberry

Botanical Name: Emblica officinalis Euphorbiaceae (sour juice of plant; sold in shops / of service to man)

Parts Used: fruit, nut, seed, leaves, root, bark, flowers

Brief Botanical Description: small to medium sized tree growing throughout India up to 4500’

Constituents: Fe, Ca, Mg, silica, B12, C. K = fruit pulp contains moisture 81%, protein .5%, fat .1%, mineral matter .7%, fiber 3.4%, carbohydrates 14%, calcium .05%, and potassium .02%, iron 1/2mg/100g. nicotinic acid.2mg/100g and vitamin C 600mg/100g.Fruit is high in pectin, phyllemblin is there. Fresh amla contains about 20 times more vitamin C than orange juice and equal in antiscorbutic value to 1-2 oranges. Dried fruit have tannins and 3-4 colloidal complexes. Other components are phyllemblic acid, lipids, gallic acid, emblicol, mucic acid, ellagic acid, glucose. Seeds contain a fixed oil, phosphatides, some essential oil with linolenic, linoleic, oleic, stearic, palmitic, myristic acids. Proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes are in seeds.

Affect on Vata, Pitta, Kapha: - - -

Guna / Attributes: lahgu, ruksha, shita; light, dry, cold

Rasa / Tastes: A M Ks Kt T; sour, sweet, astringent, pungent, bitter

Virya / Energy: Shita; cooling

Vipaka / Post-Digestive Effect: Madhura; sweet

Pharmacological Actions: (Prabhava: diuretic, purgative, digestive, longevity) erythrogenic, pacana, rasayana, refrigerant, diuretic, laxative, gastric acidity regulator, expectorant, antiinflammatory, restorative tonic, regulates blood sugar, aphrodisiac, nervine tonic, hemostatic K = daha prashamani, cakshushya, keshya, medhya, rocana, dipana, hridya, rasayana, vrisha, shukrala, svedahara, medohara, bhagnasandhanakara (heals fractures), pramehaghana; prajasthapana—promoting reproduction; diuretic, laxative, stomachic; bark is astringent. Flowers are cooling and aperient. Phyllembin in fruit pulp potentiate the action of adrenaline in vitro and in vivo. It has mild depressant action on CNS and spasmolytic action. Extract of fruit is antibacterial and antiviral; tridoshic

Indications: bleeding hemorrhoids, anemia, gout, obesity, diabetes– all types (herb of choice), hyperacidity, eczema, psoriasis, hoarse voice, sore throat, inflammation, hiccoughs, hepatitis B, nonspecific urethritis, sterility, anemia, gingivitis, glaucoma, , diarrhea, constipation, active fistula, hair loss multiple voice, threatening melanoma K = inflammation of lungs, eyes. Fixed oil for hair loss. Seeds used for asthma, bronchitis, biliousness. Dried fruit: hemorrhage, diarrhea, dysentery, anemia (with iron), jaundice, dyspepsia; acute bacillary dysentery as syrup with lemon juice; in triphala: laxative, headache, biliousness, dyspepsia, constipation, piles, enlarged liver, ascites. Juice of bark combined with honey and turmeric for gonorrhea.

Contraindications / Cautions: (OK for pregnancy but triphala is not.) acute diarrhea

Affinity: rakta, mamsa, meda, shukra; rasayana to all dhatus; purisha vs; eyes, spleen, liver, lungs

Working With Amalaki

Emblica officinalis Euphorbiaceae

Sources: Gogte, Nadkarni, Kapoor, Paranjpe

Some applications:

Externally:

As lepa good for: headaches, retention of urine (over bladder)

As juice good for: eye wash, eye disorders (cold infusion of fresh fruit)

As decoction for hair wash, eye wash

As powder good for toothpaste

Make an infusion and apply to scalp or skin as hair tonic or complexion enhancer

Internally:

N/S: strengthens bone marrow, senses, brain tonic, improves memory and pacifies sadhaka pitta

D/S: as powder or infusion improves taste and appetite, antacid, constipation; small dose is constipating while large one is laxative

As juice good for: hematemesis, epistaxis

As lehyam with candana good for pittaja vomiting

As juice with rock candy and pinch of cumin seed powder good for hyperacidity

C/S: as powder good for: cardiac tonic and hemostatic

As powder with lauha bhasma good for anemia

M-S/S: as lehyam with ashwagandha good for rasayana

Rs/S: as powder good for cough, asthma, TB

As powder with pippali and honey good for painful respiration, hiccup

U/S: as powder good for diuretic, diabetes (P)

Rp/S: aphrodisiac, helps in conception, spermatorrhea, menorrhagia, uterine debility

In/S: as powder good for skin diseases

Some Preparations:

Triphala

Cyavanaprasha

Brahmirasayana

Amalaki Rasayana: Equal parts amalaki, gokshura, guduchi (3oz.) with ghritam madhu (5oz)

Amritprasha

Rasayana Curna: excessive body heat, to nourish tissues (gokshura, guduchi, = pts.) with honey and ghritam

Fair Use Source: Ayurvedic Herbal Handbook

Phyllanthus emblica From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Indian gooseberry (amla) Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae (unranked): Angiosperms (unranked): Eudicots (unranked): Rosids Order: Malpighiales Family: Phyllanthaceae Tribe: Phyllantheae Subtribe: Flueggeinae Genus: Phyllanthus Species: P. emblica Binomial name Phyllanthus emblica L.[1] Synonyms

Cicca emblica Kurz Emblica officinalis Gaertn. Mirobalanus embilica Burm. Phyllanthus mairei Lév.

Phyllanthus emblica (syn. Emblica officinalis), the Indian gooseberry, or aamla', is a deciduous tree of the Phyllanthaceae family. It is known for its edible fruit of the same name. Contents

   1 Plant anatomy and harvesting
   2 Medical research
   3 Traditional uses
       3.1 Medicinal use
       3.2 Culinary use
       3.3 Other uses
   4 Alternate names
       4.1 See also
   5 Gallery
   6 References
   7 Further reading

[edit] Plant anatomy and harvesting

The tree is small to medium in size, reaching 8 to 18 m in height, with a crooked trunk and spreading branches. The branchlets are glabrous or finely pubescent, 10–20 cm long, usually deciduous; the leaves are simple, subsessile and closely set along branchlets, light green, resembling pinnate leaves. The flowers are greenish-yellow. The fruit are nearly spherical, light greenish yellow, quite smooth and hard on appearance, with six vertical stripes or furrows.

Ripening in autumn, the berries are harvested by hand after climbing to upper branches bearing the fruits. The taste of Indian gooseberry is sour, bitter and astringent, and is quite fibrous. In India, it is common to eat gooseberries steeped in salt water and turmeric to make the sour fruits palatable[citation needed]. It is used to straighten hair. [edit] Medical research

Indian gooseberry has undergone preliminary research, demonstrating in vitro antiviral and antimicrobial properties.[2] There is preliminary evidence in vitro that its extracts induce apoptosis and modify gene expression in osteoclasts involved in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.[3] It may prove to have potential activity against some cancers.[4] One recent animal study found treatment with E. officinalis reduced severity of acute pancreatitis (induced by L-arginine in rats). It also promoted the spontaneous repair and regeneration process of the pancreas occurring after an acute attack.[5]

Experimental preparations of leaves, bark or fruit have shown potential efficacy against laboratory models of disease, such as for inflammation, cancer, age-related renal disease, and diabetes.[6][7][8]

A human pilot study demonstrated a reduction of blood cholesterol levels in both normal and hypercholesterolemic men with treatment.[9] Another recent study with alloxan-induced diabetic rats given an aqueous amla fruit extract has shown significant decrease of the blood glucose, as well as triglyceridemic levels and an improvement of the liver function caused by a normalization of the liver-specific enzyme alanine transaminase activity.[10]

Although fruits are reputed to contain high amounts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C), 445 mg/100g,[11] the specific contents are disputed, and the overall antioxidant strength of amla may derive instead from its high density of tannins.[12] The fruit also contains other polyphenols: flavonoids, kaempferol, ellagic acid and gallic acid.[12][13] [edit] Traditional uses [edit] Medicinal use

In traditional Indian medicine, dried and fresh fruits of the plant are used. All parts of the plant are used in various Ayurvedic/Unani medicine (Jawarish amla) herbal preparations, including the fruit, seed, leaves, root, bark and flowers.[14] According to Ayurveda, aamla fruit is sour (amla) and astringent (kashaya) in taste (rasa), with sweet (madhura), bitter (tikta) and pungent (katu) secondary tastes (anurasas).[14] Its qualities (gunas) are light (laghu) and dry (ruksha), the postdigestive effect (vipaka) is sweet (madhura), and its energy (virya) is cooling (shita).[12]

According to Ayurveda, aamla is specific to pitta due to its sweet taste and cooling energy.[14] However, amla is thought to balance vata by virtue of its sour taste, and kapha due to its astringent taste and drying action. It may be used as a rasayana (rejuvenative) to promote longevity, and traditionally to enhance digestion (dipanapachana), treat constipation (anuloma), reduce fever (jvaraghna), purify the blood (raktaprasadana), reduce cough (kasahara), alleviate asthma (svasahara), strengthen the heart (hrdaya), benefit the eyes (chakshushya), stimulate hair growth (romasanjana), enliven the body (jivaniya), and enhance intellect (medhya).[14]

In Ayurvedic polyherbal formulations, Indian gooseberry is a common constituent, and most notably is the primary ingredient in an ancient herbal rasayana called Chyawanprash.[12] This formula, which contains 43 herbal ingredients as well as clarified butter, sesame oil, sugar cane juice, and honey, was first mentioned in the Charaka Samhita as a premier rejuvenative compound.[15][16] A jar of South Indian Andhra amla pickle

In Chinese traditional therapy, this fruit is called yuganzi (余甘子), which is used to cure throat inflammation. [edit] Culinary use

Particularly in South India, the fruit is pickled with salt, oil, and spices. Aamla is eaten raw or cooked into various dishes. In Andhra Pradesh, tender varieties are used to prepare dal (a lentil preparation), and amle ka murabbah, a sweet dish indigenous to the northern part of India (where in the berries are soaked in sugar syrup for a long time till they are imparted the sweet flavor); it is traditionally consumed after meals. [edit] Other uses

Popularly used in inks, shampoos and hair oils, the high tannin content of Indian gooseberry fruit serves as a mordant for fixing dyes in fabrics.[14] Amla shampoos and hair oil are traditionally believed to nourish the hair and scalp and prevent premature grey hair.[citation needed] [edit] Alternate names

Names of this tree in Indian and other languages include:

amalika (अम्लिका) in Sanskrit aamla (आँवला) in Hindi aamla (આમળા) in Gujarati aavalaa (आवळा) (or awla) in Marathi avaalo (आवाळो) in Konkani amala (अमला) in Nepali amloki (আমলকী) in Bengali amlakhi in Assamese aanla in Odiya olay in Punjabi nellikka (നെല്ലിക്ക) in Malayalam heikru in Manipuri sohmylleng in Khasi usiri (ఉసిరి కాయ) (or usirikai ) in Telugu nellikkai (நெல்லிக்காய்/ ನೆಲ್ಲಿ ಕಾಯಿ/ ಗುಡ್ದದ ನೆಲ್ಲಿ)(or nellikkaai, nellikaayi) in Tamil and Kannada nelli (නෙල්ලි) in Sinhala haliilaj or ihliilaj in Arabic, derived from the word ihliilaji with the sense 'elliptical', perhaps because of the fruit's shape mak kham bom in Lao ma kham pom (มะขามป้อม) in Thai anmole (庵摩勒) in Chinese skyu ru ra (སྐྱུ་རུ་ར་) in Tibetan melaka in Malay, A state in Malaysia, Malacca was named after this tree.

Also found are the names emblic, emblic myrobalan, malacca tree and the variants in spelling aola, ammalaki, aamvala, aawallaa, dharty, nillika, and nellikya. [edit] See also

Emblicanin (antioxidant) [edit] Gallery

   Fruit with young leaves and flower buds.
   New leaves.
   Flowering twigs.
   Tree trunk.

[edit] References

   ^ "Phyllanthus emblica information from NPGS/GRIN". US Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2008-03-06.
   ^ Saeed S, Tariq P (Jan 2007). "Antibacterial activities of Emblica officinalis and Coriandrum sativum against Gram negative urinary pathogens". Pak J Pharm Sci 20 (1): 32–5. PMID 17337425.
   ^ Penolazzi L et al. Induction of apoptosis of human primary osteoclasts treated with extracts from the medicinal plant Emblica officinalis. BMC Compl Altern Med 2008;8:59 [1]
   ^ Ngamkitidechakul C, Jaijoy K, Hansakul P, Soonthornchareonnon N, Sireeratawong S.,"Antitumour effects of Phyllanthus emblica L.: induction of cancer cell apoptosis and inhibition of in vivo tumour promotion and in vitro invasion of human cancer cells." Phytother Res. 2010 Sep;24(9):1405-13
   ^ Shabir Sidhu, Promila Pandhi, Samir Malhotra, Kim Vaiphei, Kundal Lal Khanduja ,"Beneficial Effects of Emblica officinalis in l-Arginine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats", Journal of Medicinal Food. January/February 2011, 14(1-2): 147-155.
   ^ Ganju L, Karan D, Chanda S, Srivastava KK, Sawhney RC, Selvamurthy W (Sep 2003). "Immunomodulatory effects of agents of plant origin". Biomed Pharmacother. 57 (7): 296–300. doi:10.1016/S0753-3322(03)00095-7. PMID 14499177.
   ^ Yokozawa T, Kim HY, Kim HJ, et al. (Sep 2007). "Amla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.) attenuates age-related renal dysfunction by oxidative stress". J Agric Food Chem. 55 (19): 7744–52. doi:10.1021/jf072105s. PMID 17715896.
   ^ Rao TP, Sakaguchi N, Juneja LR, Wada E, Yokozawa T (2005). "Amla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.) extracts reduce oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats". J Med Food 8 (3): 362–8. doi:10.1089/jmf.2005.8.362. PMID 16176148.
   ^ Jacob A, Pandey M, Kapoor S, Saroja R (Nov 1988). "Effect of the Indian gooseberry (amla) on serum cholesterol levels in men aged 35-55 years". Eur J Clin Nutr 42 (11): 939–44. PMID 3250870.
   ^ Qureshi SA, Asad W, Sultana V (Jan 2009). "The Effect of Phyllantus emblica Linn on Type — II Diabetes, Triglycerides and Liver — Specific Enzyme". Pakistan Journal of Nutrition. 8 (2): 125–128. doi:10.3923/pjn.2009.125.128.
   ^ Tarwadi K, Agte V (Aug 2007). "Antioxidant and micronutrient potential of common fruits available in the Indian subcontinent". Int J Food Sci Nutr 58 (5): 341–9. doi:10.1080/09637480701243905. PMID 17558726.
   ^ a b c d Dharmananda S. Emblic Myrobalans: Amla, Institute of Traditional Medicine [2]
   ^ Habib-ur-Rehman, Yasin KA, Choudhary MA, et al. (Jul 2007). "Studies on the chemical constituents of Phyllanthus emblica". Nat. Prod. Res. 21 (9): 775–81. doi:10.1080/14786410601124664. PMID 17763100.
   ^ a b c d e Caldecott T. Amalaki
   ^ Samhita C. Ed., translation by the Shree Gulabkunverba Society, Volume 4. Chikitsa Sthana, Jamnagar, India: 1949
   ^ Indian Ministry of Health and Family Planning. The Ayurvedic Formulary of India. Part I. 1st ed. Delhi, 1978.

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[edit] Further reading

   Winston, David; Maimes, Steven (2007). Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief. Healing Arts Press. ISBN 1594771588. Contains a detailed monograph on Emblica officinalis (Amla; Indian gooseberry; Amalaki) as well as a discussion of health benefits.
   Puri, Harsharnjit Singh (2002). "Amalaki (Phyllanthus emblica)". Rasayana: Ayurvedic Herbs for Longevity and Rejuvenation. Traditional Herbal Medicines for Modern Times, Vol. 2. Boca Raton: CRC. pp. 22–42. ISBN 0-415-28489-9.
   Caldecott, Todd (2006). Ayurveda: The Divine Science of Life. Elsevier/Mosby. ISBN 0723434107. Contains a detailed monograph on Phyllanthus emblica (Amla; Indian gooseberry; Amalaki) as well as a discussion of health benefits and usage in clinical practice. Available online at http://www.toddcaldecott.com/index.php/herbs/learning-herbs/397-amalaki
 	 

 	 

 	 
Categories: Phyllanthaceae | Berries | Flora of India | Flora of Pakistan | Medicinal plants of Nepal | Ayurvedic medicaments

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