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pabongka_rinpoche [2018/02/26 18:12] (current)
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 +======= Pabongka Rinpoche =======
 +
 +'''​Pabongka Rinpoche'''​ ({{bo|t=ཕ་བོང་ཁ་|w=Pha-bong-kha}};​ also spelt Phabongkha),​ Jampa [[Tenzin]] Trinlay [[Gyatso]], (1878–1941) was one of the great [[wp>​Gelug]] [[Lama]]s of the modern era of [[Tibetan Buddhism]]. He attained his [[Geshe]] degree at [[wp>​Sera Monastic University]],​ [[wp>​Lhasa]],​ and became a highly influential teacher in [[Tibet]], unusual for teaching a great number of [[upasaka|lay people]]. He was the [[root Lama]] of both [[wp>​Kyabje]] [[wp>​Ling Rinpoche]] and Kyabje [[wp>​Trijang Rinpoche]], the two tutors of the present [[Dalai Lama]], and the teacher of most of the other [[Gelug]] Lamas who have been bringing the [[wp>​Dharma (Buddhism)|Dharma]] to the West since they fled [[wp>​Tibet]] in [[wp>​1959]].<​ref>​[http://​www.lamayeshe.com/​index.php?​sect=author&​subsect=bio&​id=47 ''​Pabongkha Rinpoche'​s Biography''​] by the [[FPMT]]</​ref>​ Pabongka was offered the regency of the present Dalai Lama but declined the request because "he strongly disliked political affairs."<​ref>​Mullin,​ Glenn, & Shepherd, Valerie (2001). ''​The fourteen Dalai Lamas: A sacred legacy of reincarnation''​. Santa Fe, NM: Clear Light, p. 475.</​ref>​
 +
 +====== Early life and education======
 +
 +Pabongka Rinpoche was born in 1878, at a town called Tsawa Li in the [[wp>​Yeru Shang]] district of the state of [[wp>​Tsang]],​ north of [[wp>​Lhasa]] in [[wp>​Tibet]]. ​
 +
 +According to [[wp>​Ribur Rinpoche]], one of Je Phabongkhapa'​s main disciples: “Lord Pabongka [[wp>​Vajradhara]] Dechen Nyingpo Pal Zangpo was born north of Lhasa in 1878. His father was a minor official but the family was not wealthy. Although the night was dark, a light shone in the room, and people outside the house had a vision of a protector on the roof.”<​ref name="​Rilbur Rinpoche 2006">​Rilbur Rinpoche, ''​Pabongka Rinpoche: A Memoir''​ quoted in ''​Liberation in the palm of your hand: A concise discourse on the path to enlightenment''​ (2006). Boston: Wisdom Publications,​ p. xiii</​ref>​
 +
 +As a child he was alleged to exhibit unusual qualities and in his seventh year was taken before Sharpa Chuje Lobsang Dargye, one of the leading religious figures of the day, who "felt sure that the boy must be a reincarnated saint" and foretold that if the child were placed in the Gyalrong House of [[wp>​Sera]] Mey Monastery, something "​wonderful would happen with him in the future."​ Later on, he was found to be a reincarnation of the [[wp>​Changkya]] line, which included the well-known scholar [[wp>​Changkya Rolpay Dorje]] (1717-1786 AD). The Lamas of this line had done much teaching in the regions of [[wp>​Mongolia]] and [[wp>​China]],​ including in the court of the Chinese emperor himself, and so the name "​Changkya"​ had strong Chinese connotations. As the Tibetan government and people were already sensitive to the pressures put on them from China, the name "​Changkya"​ was ruled out and the boy declared to be "​Pabongka"​ instead.<​ref name="​gyalrong.com">​Khen Rinpoche Geshe Lobsang Tharchin, [http://​gyalrong.com/​Gyalrong_Khangtsen_Sera_Mey/​Pabongka_Rinpoche.html ''​The Principal Teachings of Buddhism''​]</​ref>​
 +
 +======His Spiritual Guide and practice of Buddhism======
 +Pabongka received his formal spiritual education at [[wp>​Sera Mey]] Monastery. At first he was very poor and not famous. He studied hard to be a [[wp>​Geshe]],​ meditated and gave empowerments. Pabongka studied with Jaba Sonpo Rinpoche; however his [[wp>​root Guru]] or Spiritual Guide was Dagpo Lama Rinpoche (sometimes spelt Tagpo or Thagpo).
 +
 +Ribur Rinpoche described how Je Phabongkhapa met his root Guru: "His root guru was Dagpo Lama Rinpoche Jampael Lhuendrub Gyatso, from Lhoka. He was definitely a [[Bodhisattva]],​ and Pabongka Rinpoche was his foremost disciple. He lived in a cave in [[wp>​Pasang]] and his main practice was [[wp>​Bodhichitta]];​ his main deity was [[Avalokiteshvara]] and he would recite 50,000 [[wp>​mani]]s [the [[wp>​mantra]],​ [[wp>om mani padme hum]] every night. When Kyabje Pabongka first met [[wp>​Dagpo Rinpoche]] at a [[wp>​tsog]] offering ceremony in [[Lhasa]], he cried out of reverence from beginning to end."<​ref name="​Rilbur Rinpoche 2006"/> ​
 +
 +Je Phabongkhapa was a keen meditator and emphasized [[wp>​Lamrim]],​ [[Lojong]] and [[wp>​Mahamudra]]. When he had finished his studies at [[Sera Monastery]],​ he visited Dagpo Lama Rinpoche in his cave and was sent into a Lamrim retreat nearby. According to Ribur Rinpoche: "Dagpo Lama Rinpoche would teach him a Lam-rim topic and then Pabongka Rinpoche would go away and meditate on it. Later he would return to explain what he’d understood: if he had gained some realization,​ Dagpo Lama Rinpoche would teach him some more and Pabongka Rinpoche would go back and meditate on that. It went on like this for ten years."<​ref name="​Rilbur Rinpoche 2006"/>​
 +
 +Pabongka Rinpoche was a renunciate and eschewed worldly attainments and politics. His faithful attendant once demolished the small old building inhabited by Pabongka Rinpoche while he was a way on a long tour, and constructed in its place a large ornate residence rivaling the private quarters of the Dalai Lama. When Pabongka Rinpoche returned he was not pleased and said, “I am only a minor hermit Lama and you should not have built something like this for me. I am not famous and the essence of what I teach is renunciation of the worldly life. Therefore I am embarrassed by rooms like these.”<​ref name="​ReferenceA">​Rilbur Rinpoche, ''​Pabongka Rinpoche: A Memoir''​ quoted in ''​Liberation in the palm of your hand: A concise discourse on the path to enlightenment''​ (2006). Boston: Wisdom Publications</​ref>​
 +
 +According to Ribur Rinpoche, Je Phabongkhapa was always gentle and never got angry: "Any anger had been completely pacified by his bodhichitta."​ Even when long lines of people were waiting for blessings, he would ask each one individually how they were and tap them on the head. Sometimes he dispensed medicine.<​ref name="​ReferenceA"/>​
 +
 +His two main spiritual qualities according to his disciples were, from the Tantric point of view, his realization and ability to present [[Heruka]], and from the [[Sutra]] point of view, his ability to teach [[Lamrim]]. He attributed all his qualities to his own Spiritual Guide, showing him deference throughout his life. Whenever he visited his Spiritual Guide'​s monastery, he would dismount as soon as it appeared in view and prostrate all the way to the door and when he left he would walk backwards until it was out of sight.<​ref name="​ReferenceA"/>​
 +
 +Pabongka Rinpoche’s full name was Kyabje Pabongkapa Jetsun Jampa Tenzin Trinley Gyatso Pel Sangpo, which translates as the “Lord Protector, the one from Pabongka, the venerable and glorious Master whose name is the Loving One, Keeper of the Buddha’s Teachings, Ocean of the Mighty Deeds of the Buddha.” He is also popularly known as “Dechen Nyingpo,” which means “Essence of Great Bliss” and refers to his mastery of the secret teachings of Buddhism.<​ref>​Khen Rinpoche'​s Forward to ''​The Principal Teachings of Buddhism''​ by Tsongkhapa, with a commentary by Pabongka Rinpoche, translated by Geshe Lobsang Tharchin, Mahayana Sutra and Tantra Press 1998</​ref>​
 +
 +==Achievements==
 +===As a Buddhist Teacher===
 +After his graduation from Sera Mey with the attainment of a Geshe degree, Pabongka Rinpoche had great success in his teaching tours through the countryside outside the capital Lhasa, and his fame started to spread. With his great skill as a public teacher, he gradually began to build up a large following, his teachings bringing as many as 10,000 students. These included lay people from all over [[Tibet]], which broke with the long-held tradition of only teaching to those ordained as monks.<​ref name="​gyalrong.com"/>​ According to one reincarnate Lama who attended his teachings: "He was an exceptionally learned and gifted scholar, and his interpretation of the Doctrine adhered to the meaning of the Lord Buddha'​s words exactly. He was short, broad-faced,​ and of rather heavy build, but when he opened his mouth to speak his words had such clarity and sweetness that no one could help being moved."​ .<​ref>​Rato Kyongla Nawang Losang, ''​My Life and Lives'',​ p 98, published by Dutton.</​ref> ​
 +
 +Pabongka Rinpoche was the first [[Gelug]] teacher who taught lay persons outside the monasteries and became very influential. In his memoir of his root [[Guru]], Rilbur Rinpoche said:
 +<​blockquote>​
 +When he taught he would sit for up to eight hours without moving. About two thousand people would come to his general discourses and initiations and fewer to special teachings, but when he gave [[Bodhisattva]] vows, up to ten thousand people would show up.<​ref>​Rilbur Rinpoche, ''​Pabongka Rinpoche: A Memoir''​ quoted in ''​Liberation in the palm of your hand: A concise discourse on the path to enlightenment''​ (2006). Boston: Wisdom Publications,​ p. xvi</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote> ​
 +
 +Kyongla Rinpoche described his teachings:
 +<​blockquote>​The Rinpoche was accustomed to illustrate his teaching by means of concrete examples and personal stories, with abundant references to the teaching of the Lord [[Buddha]] and to the commentaries of ancient scholars and saints. Whenever he noticed that his audience was becoming tired or restless, he would tell a comical story to rouse them and get a laugh.</​blockquote> ​
 +
 +The Lharampa [[Geshe]] Khen Rinpoche described attending Pabongka Rinpoche'​s teachings thus: <​blockquote>​
 +His voice was incredibly powerful. On many occasions he would address gatherings of many thousands of people, yet everyone could hear him clearly (in those days in Tibet we had never heard of microphones or loudspeakers)... Pabongka Rinpoche had an uncanny ability to relate to his audience, and for this reason he became a teacher for the common man as well as for us monks. The Rinpoche’s great accomplishment was that he found a way to attract and lead listeners of every level. His most famous weapon was his humor. Public discourses in Tibet could sometimes go on for ten hours or more without a break, and only a great saint could keep his attention up so long. Inevitably part of the audience would start to nod, or fall into some reverie. Then Pabongka Rinpoche would suddenly relate an amusing story or joke with a useful moral, and send his listeners into peals of laughter. This would startle the day-dreamers,​ who were always looking around and asking their neighbors to repeat the joke to them.”<​ref>​Forward to ''​The Principal Teachings of Buddhism''​ by Tsongkhapa, with a commentary by Pabongka Rinpoche, translated by Geshe Lobsang Tharchin, Mahayana Sutra and Tantra Press 1998</​ref></​blockquote> ​
 +
 +In ''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand'',​ Trijang Rinpoche says he attempted to convey the "​extraordinary"​ qualities of Je Phabongkhapa'​s teachings, which he described: <​blockquote>​
 +Each part of the teaching was enriched by instructions taken from the confidential oral lineages. Each section was illustrated by analogies, conclusive formal logic, amazing stories, and trustworthy quotations. The teaching could easily be understood by beginners, and yet was tailored for all levels of intelligence. It was beneficial for the mind because it was so inspiring. Sometimes we were moved to laughter, becoming wide awake and alive. Sometimes we were reduced to tears and cried helplessly. At other times we became afraid or were moved to feel, ‘I would gladly give up this life and devote myself solely to my practice.’ This feeling of renunciation was overwhelming. These are some of the ways in which all of his discourses were so extraordinary.<​ref name="​truthaboutshugden.wordpress.com">​[http://​truthaboutshugden.wordpress.com/​my-guru-kind-in-three-ways-whose-name-i-find-difficult-to-utter-the-great-lama-je-pabongka-according-to-his-disciples/​his-eminence-trijang-dorjechang-losang-yeshe/​this-feeling-of-renunciation-was-overwhelming/​ Trijang Rinpoche'​s introduction to ''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand''​ - A Concise Discourse on the Path to Enlightenment by Pabongka Rinpoche], Wisdom Publications 1991.</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +Je Phabongkhapa apparently had an ability to reach even those of the higher echelons of society who were not much interested in Dharma. For example, Dapon Tsago, a member of the nobility who held a powerful position equivalent to Minister of Defense, once attended a public teaching "not to hear the [[Dharma]] but rather to put in an appearance"​ as Jetsun Khen Rinpoche describes it: <​blockquote>​
 +So one day this great general marches in to the hall, decked out in silk, his long hair flowing in carefully tailored locks (this was considered manly and high fashion in old Tibet)... A great ceremonial sword hung from his belt, clanging importantly as he swaggered in. By the end of the first section of the teaching he was seen leaving the hall quietly, deep in thought—he had wrapped his weapon of war in a cloth to hide it, and was taking it home. Later on we could see he had actually trimmed off his warrior’s locks, and finally one day he threw himself before the Rinpoche and asked to be granted the special lifetime religious vows for laymen. Thereafter he always followed Pabongka Rinpoche around, to every public teaching he gave.<​ref>​Forward to ''​The Principal Teachings of Buddhism''​ by Tsongkhapa, with a commentary by Pabongka Rinpoche, translated by Geshe Lobsang Tharchin, Mahayana Sutra and Tantra Press 1998 "​http://​truthaboutshugden.wordpress.com/​2009/​03/​12/​%E2%80%9C%E2%80%A6it-was-in-his-private-quarters-at-the-tashi-chuling-hermitage-that-i-first-met-pabongka-rinpoche%E2%80%A6%E2%80%9D/"</​ref></​blockquote>​
 +
 +According to the Western monk Helmut Gassner, the Dalai Lama's translator for 17 years: <​blockquote>​
 +It is said that when Pabongka Rinpoche gave [[Dharma]] discourses many in the audience gained profound insights into the failings of our worldly concerns to develop the lasting determination to exchange the constant quest for honor, praise, well-being and gain with sincere aspiration, kindness and concern for others. This unusual ability to teach is not an integral part of Tibetan culture. It is rather at the heart of the living transmission of the teachings of the historical [[Buddha]] from one great master to the next. It is, first and foremost, an oral transmission:​ the master teaches his gifted disciple continuously until the transmitted knowledge becomes the student'​s second nature.<​ref name="​schettini.com">​[http://​www.schettini.com/​HelmutGassner01.pdf Speech given by Ven. Helmut Gassner at the Symposium organized by Friedrich Naumann Stiftung in Hamburg, March 26th 1999]</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +Due to his skill as a Buddhist master, the thirteenth Dalai Lama requested Kyabje Phabongka to give the yearly [[Lamrim]] teachings in 1925, instead of asking the Ganden throneholder ([[Ganden Tripa]]) as was customary. Usually these teachings lasted seven days, but these lasted for eleven days.<​ref>''​Chod in the Ganden Tradition''​ : The Oral Instructions of Kyabje Zong Rinpoche By Kyabje Zong Rinpoche Snow lion 2006</​ref> ​
 +
 +Je Phabongkhapa had a profound and far-reaching influence on the [[Gelug]] tradition:
 +<​blockquote>​
 +Pabongka Rinpoche was probably the most influential Gelug lama of this century, holding all the important lineages of [[sutra]] and [[tantra]] and passing them on to most of the important Gelug lamas of the next two generations;​ the list of his oral discourses is vast in depth and breadth. He was also the root guru of the Kyabje Ling Rinpoche (1903-83), Senior Tutor of the [[Dalai Lama]], [[Trijang Rinpoche]], and many other highly respected teachers. His collected works occupy fifteen large volumes and over every aspect of Buddhism. If you have ever received a teaching from a Gelug lama, you have been influenced by Pabongka Rinpoche.<​ref>​Michael Richards, from the translator’s introduction,​ ''​Liberation in the palm of your hand: A concise discourse on the path to enlightenment''​ (2006). Boston: Wisdom Publications,​ p. x</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +His foremost disciple, [[Trijang Rinpoche]], praises his teacher highly in ''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand'',​ including: <​blockquote>​
 +Our childish minds were unfit vessels for so vast an ocean of teachings, so precious a source of qualities. How sad if these teachings were forgotten!<​ref>​[http://​truthaboutshugden.wordpress.com/​my-guru-kind-in-three-ways-whose-name-i-find-difficult-to-utter-the-great-lama-je-pabongka-according-to-his-disciples/​his-eminence-trijang-dorjechang-losang-yeshe/​our-childish-minds-were-unfit-vessels-for-so-vast-an-ocean-of-teachings/​ Trijang Rinpoche’s introduction to ''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand''​ - A Concise Discourse on the Path to Enlightenment by Pabongka Rinpoche] edited by Trijang Rinpoche, translated by Michael Richards, Wisdom Publications 1991.</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +In Geshe Ngawang Dhargeyey'​s commentary to the ''​Wheel of Sharp Weapons'',​ he says<​ref>​Wheel of Sharp Weapons, with Commentary by Geshe Ngawang Dhargyey, page 55. ISBN 81-85102-08-2 Published by the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives - Second revised edition 1994</​ref>:​ <​blockquote>​
 +Likewise, Lama Trijang Dorje Chang, Junior Tutor to His Holiness the present Dalai Lama, folds his hands upon the crown of his head whenever he mentions Kyabje Pa-bongkha Rinpoche. He was such a great lama, unsurpassed by any, that hardly any lamas or geshes of the Three Pillars (the monasteries of Ganden, Sera and Drepung) had not been his disciples.
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +===As a Buddhist author===
 +
 +In 1921 at Chuzang Hermitage near Lhasa, Pabongka Rinpoche gave a historic 24-day exposition on the [[Lam Rim]], or "​stages of the path," that was attended by some seven hundred people. Many monks came from the three major monasteries in Lhasa, and many more travelled weeks from the Central Province, from Tsang, and from as far away as Amdo and Kham. This included about 30 lamas and reincarnations of lamas. There were also many lay people present. According to Rato Khyongla Rinpoche, who was present: "​During that summer session several traders and at least two high government officials found their lives transformed by his eloquence: they forsook their jobs to study religion and to give themselves to meditation."​ <​ref>''​My Life and Lives'',​ p 98, Rato Khyongla Nawang Losang, published by Dutton.</​ref>​
 +
 +The teachings covered every topic in the progressive stages to attain enlightenment. These teachings were transcribed and edited by one of his main students, [[Trijang Rinpoche]], who later became the Junior Tutor of the 14th [[Dalai Lama]]. Trijang Rinpoche explains the good qualities of the Lamrim teachings given by his root Guru and then explains how the idea of the book came to him: <​blockquote>​
 +How could I possibly convey all this on paper! Yet what a pity if all the key points contained in these inspiring instructions were lost. This thought gave me the courage to write this book. As my precious guru later advised me, ‘Some of the people present could not follow the teaching. I’m afraid I do not trust all the notes people took during the classes. I therefore ask you to publish a book. Put in it anything you feel sure of.’ In this book I have accurately recorded my lama’s teachings in the hope that this substitute for his speech will be beneficial to my friends who wish to succeed in their practice.<​ref name="​truthaboutshugden.wordpress.com"/>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +Published in Tibetan in 1958, these teachings were eventually translated into English and published as ''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand''​ (Tib. rNam grol lag bcangs) in 1991. This book forms the basis of most Gelug teachers’ Lam Rim presentations,​ including those of the [[FPMT]]<​ref>​[http://​www.lamayeshe.com/​index.php?​sect=author&​id=47 ''​Teachings by Pabongka Rinpoche''​] by the FPMT</​ref>​ and of Geshe [[Kelsang Gyatso]]’s acclaimed Lam Rim text ''​Joyful Path of Good Fortune''​.<​ref>''​Joyful Path of Good Fortune'',​ Tharpa Publications</​ref> ​
 +
 +Kyabje Pabongka also wrote many other books. His collected works occupy fifteen large volumes and cover every aspect of [[Buddhism]].<​ref>​Liberation in the palm of your hand: A concise discourse on the path to enlightenment (2006). Boston: Wisdom Publications,​ Page 6</​ref>​ These texts provide explanations on sadhanas, chanting, how to make tormas and myriad other subjects. Among these texts, is a Dorje Shugden practice which includes the empowerment<​ref>​[http://​members.tripod.com/​~shugden/​pabongkha.html ''​Mahasiddha Pabongka Rinpoche''​],​ retrieved 2009-02-18.</​ref>​ and the sadhana of the female Buddha Vajrayogini,​ based on the [[Heruka]] Root [[Tantra]]. Both of these texts are widely used in the [[Gelugpa]] tradition today.<​ref>​[http://​www.tharpa.com/​us/​sadhana-Quick.Path.to.Great.Bliss-725.html ''​Quick Path to Great Bliss''​],​ Tharpa Publications.</​ref>​
 +
 +[[Image:​DakpoGompa.jpg|thumb|300px|Dakpo Gompa - Where Je Pabongka attained enlightenment]]
 +
 +===Other spiritual activities===
 +Also known as Trinlay Gyatso, Je Pabongka held the lineage of the Tantric Deity [[Heruka]]. According to Geshe [[Kelsang Gyatso]]: "This great Lama was like the sun of [[Dharma]], illuminating the hidden meaning of both [[Sutra]] and Secret Mantra ([[Tantra]]). He passed the [[Mahamudra]] lineage to his heart Son, Yongdzin Trijang Dorjechang."<​ref>​[http://​www.about-tantra.org/​tantric-teachers.php/​ ''​Tantric Teachers''​] at AboutTantra.org,​ retrieved 2009-02-18.</​ref> ​
 +
 +[[Lama Zopa]] of the [[FPMT]] praised the enlightened qualities of Je Phabongkhapa (Pabongka Dechen Nyingpo):<​blockquote>​
 +
 +My root guru, His Holiness [[Trijang Rinpoche]]; Pabongka Dechen Nyingpo, His Holiness the [[Dalai Lama]]’s guru’s root guru; His Holiness Zong Rinpoche, from whom many of the older students received the initiation of Shugden; and the previous incarnation of Gomo Rinpoche, who has a strong connection with Istituto Lama Tzong Khapa, here in Italy, all promoted the practice of Shugden. They were all aspects of the Dharmakaya.<​ref>​Lama Zopa, [http://​www.fpmt.org/​organization/​announcements/​shugden/​ILTKtalk-Thirdedit.pdf ''​Talk given at Istituto Lama Tzong Khapa''​],​ 2000-10-22, p. 6, retrieved 2009-02-12.</​ref></​blockquote>​
 +
 +Je Phabongkhapa had many disciples, including the most famous Gelugpa Lamas of the twentieth century, who consider him to be a source of uncommon inspiration. Rilbur Rinpoche, for example, was held and tortured by the Chinese for two decades and famously said “If I told you what happened on a regular basis, you would find it hard to believe.” By all accounts he emerged from his trials with a heart full of love and forgiveness and, when asked how, he replied that it was due to the blessings and teachings of his root Lama Kyabje Pabongka Rinpoche.
 +
 +According to [[Kyabje Zong Rinpoche]], a highly regarded Lharampa [[Geshe]], Je Phabongkhapa was considered an emanation of the Highest Yoga [[Tantra]] Deity, Buddha Heruka. He explains how 32 reincarnate Lamas, including his own teacher Tapu Dorjechang, attended his [[Lamrim]] teachings in Lhasa: <​blockquote>​
 +Tapu Dorje Chang could hear statues of Avalokiteshvara and Tara speak, and saw visions of multi-armed Yidams (Deities). Once Kyabje Phabongka invoked the wisdom beings of Heruka’s mandala to enter into a statue of Heruka Chakrasambara. Heruka then offered nectar to Kyabje Phabongka, and prophesied that seven generations of his disciples would be protected by the body mandala of Heruka. Kyabje Trijang Dorje Chang is cared for by Heruka Chakrasambara,​ as are his disciples.<​ref>''​Chod in the Ganden Tradition''​ : The Oral Instructions of Kyabje Zong Rinpoche By Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, Snow Lion 2006</​ref></​blockquote> ​
 +
 +Geshe [[Kelsang Gyatso]] also describes Je Phabongkhapa as an emanation of Buddha Heruka.<​ref>''​Heart Jewel''​ page 90, Tharpa Publications</​ref>​ Geshe Ngawang Dhargyey gives an account of his mastery of the practice in his commentary to ''​Wheel of Sharp Weapons''<​ref>''​The Wheel of Sharp Weapons'',​ with Commentary by Geshe Ngawang Dhargyey, page 55, ISBN 81-85102-08-2 Published by the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives - Second revised edition 1994.</​ref>:​ <​blockquote>​
 +Once, in the cave-under-water,​ he experienced a manifestation of Yamantaka for nine days, while he himself was essentially Heruka Chakrasambhava. Further, he experienced a manifestation of Vajra Yogini who told him of the benefits to be derived from merging the Vajra Yogini teachings of the Sakya and Gelug traditions into one meditational practice. When he once made a great (tsog) offering beside a Heruka statue in Lhasa, the wisdom body actually entered into the statue. The statue danced and told him that whoever received Heruka initiation from him up to the seventh generator would be taken to the dakini realms.
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +Je Phabongkhapa'​s most famous disciples were Kyabje [[Trijang Rinpoche]] and [[Kyabje Ling Rinpoche]] because they were the main teachers of the 14th Dalai Lama, who considered Trijang Rinpoche to be his root Guru.<​ref>''​Bliss and Emptiness''​ by the Dalai Lama</​ref>​ Kyabje Zong Rinpoche explains: <​blockquote>​
 +Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche and Kyabje Ling Rinpoche were tutors to His Holiness the Dalai Lama. They taught His Holiness everything from basic teachings to advanced levels. Kyabje Phabongka passed all of his lineages to Kyabje Trijang Dorje Chang. He often said this in discourses. The purpose of this detailed exposition is to affirm the power of the lineage. If we lose faith in the lineage, we are lost.<​ref>''​Chod in the Ganden Tradition''​ : The Oral Instructions of Kyabje Zong Rinpoche by Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, Snow Lion 2006</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +In addition to Kyabje [[Trijang Rinpoche]] and [[Kyabje Ling Rinpoche]], Je Pabongka had two other main disciples. They were Khangsar Rinpoche and Tathag Rinpoche. Tathag Rinpoche was the main teacher of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama when he was a child and gave him his novice ordination. Khangsar Rinpoche'​s Chinese disciple, Master Nan Hai, started a Buddhist movement in China that survived till the present day despite political changes in Communist China, with tens of thousands of spiritual descendants and over a hundred monasteries and nunneries throughout China.<​ref>​[http://​www.b-i-a.net/​pabongkha%20rinpoche.htm ''​Pabongkha Rinpoche''​] by Buddhist International Alliance. retrieved 2009-10-15.</​ref>​
 +
 +====Holder of the Ganden Oral Lineage====
 +Pabongka Rinpoche was the holder of the Geden, or [[Ganden]], Oral Lineage. As Geshe Helmut Gassner explains: <​blockquote>​
 +The great master Pabongka was in the first half of the twentieth century the pivotal or key lineage holder of the Oral Geden Tradition. Many other teachers before him mastered certain aspects of the tradition'​s teachings, but it was Pabongka Rinpoche'​s particular merit to locate and find all these partial transmissions,​ to learn and realize them, and bring them together once again to pass them on through a single person. In his lifetime there was hardly a significant figure of the Geden tradition who had not been Pabongka Rinpoche'​s disciple. Kyabje [[Trijang Rinpoche]] was the one capable of receiving and passing on the entirety of the Oral Geden Tradition once again. The [[Dorje Shugden]] practice is an integral part of that tradition.<​ref name="​schettini.com"/>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +====Holder of the Heruka Body Mandala Lineage====
 +
 +According to [[Kyabje Zong Rinpoche]]: <​blockquote>​
 +Once Kyabje Phabongka invoked the wisdom beings of Heruka’s mandala to enter into a statue of Heruka [[Chakrasamvara]]. Heruka then offered nectar to Kyabje Phabongka, and prophesied that seven generations of his disciples would be protected by the body mandala of Heruka. Kyabje [[Trijang Rinpoche]] is cared for by Heruka Chakrasamvara,​ as are his disciples.<​ref>​Chod in the Ganden Tradition by Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, Snow Lion Publications 2006</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +====His work and retreat schedule====
 +Je Phabongkhapa'​s primary residence was first the small monastery atop the Pabongka rock (see picture), called Dakpo Gompa, where he allegedly attained enlightenment. When his fame grew, Ngakpa College of Sera Monastery offered him a large retreat complex on the hillside above Pabongka, called Tashi Chuling, or “Auspicious Spiritual Isle.” There were about sixty Buddhist monks in residence there, and about sixteen personal attendants who helped him with his busy schedule. Je Phabongkhapa divided his time between Tashi Chuling and a small meditation cell built around the mouth of a cave, further up the side of the mountain, known as Takden. Pabongka Rinpoche would go to Takden for long periods to do private meditations.<​ref>​Foreword to ''​The Principal Teachings of Buddhism''​ by Tsongkhapa, with a commentary by Pabongka Rinpoche, translated by Geshe Lobsang Tharchin, Mahayana Sutra and Tantra Press, 1998 "​http://​truthaboutshugden.wordpress.com/​2009/​03/​12/​%E2%80%9C%E2%80%A6it-was-in-his-private-quarters-at-the-tashi-chuling-hermitage-that-i-first-met-pabongka-rinpoche%E2%80%A6%E2%80%9D/"</​ref>​
 +
 +==Views==
 +===Position on politics and religion===
 +When the regency of the 14th Dalai Lama was offered to Pabongka Rinpoche, he declined become the regent saying, "If one cannot give up the worldly dharma, then you are not a true religious person."<​ref>​Goldstein,​ Melvyn C., and Gelek Rimpoche. A History of Modern Tibet, 1913-1951: The Demise of the Lamaist State. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989, p. 363.</​ref>​ According to Goldstein, Pabongka was quite well known for saying that "lamas should not become involved in politics."<​ref>​Goldstein,​ Melvyn C., and Gelek Rimpoche. A History of Modern Tibet, 1913-1951: The Demise of the Lamaist State. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989, p. 362.</​ref>​
 +
 +===Position on other Tibetan Buddhist schools===
 +Although he was a Gelugpa Lama, Je Phabongkhapa respected the four schools of Tibetan Buddhism and discouraged sectarianism. In ''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand'',​ he said:<​blockquote>​
 +Abandoning Dharma is, in the final analysis, disparaging the Hinayana because of the Mahayana; favoring the Hinayana on account of the Mahayana; playing off sutra against tantra; playing off the four classes of the tantras against each other; favoring one of the Tibetan schools—the Sakya, Gelug, Kagyu, or Nyingma—and disparaging the rest; and so on. In other words, we abandon Dharma any time we favor our own tenets and disparage the rest.<​ref>''​Liberation in the palm of your hand: A concise discourse on the path to enlightenment''​ (2006). Boston: Wisdom Publications,​ p. 137</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote> ​
 +Je Phabongkhapa also said that [[Padmasambhava]] (the founder of the [[Nyingma]] school), [[Je Tsongkhapa]],​ [[Atisha]], and [[Buddha]] [[Shakyamuni]] were all one holy being, not four separate mental continuums.<​ref>''​Liberation in the palm of your hand: A concise discourse on the path to enlightenment''​ (2006). Boston: Wisdom Publications,​ pp. 158-159</​ref>​
 +
 +Pabongka Rinpoche was at times at odds with the 13th [[Dalai Lama]] over Pabongka'​s supposed antagonism toward the [[Nyingma]] lineage. His advocacy of the [[Dorje Shugden]] Protector practice is also now criticized by some in the Tibetan Buddhist world. {{Citation needed|date=September 2008}} Von Bruck, however, says that Pabongka'​s Shugden text "does not say that only Gelukpa teaching leads to liberation, but calls Tsongkhapa'​s teaching the highest and the essence of all teachings. But this is traditional parlance and not an exaggerated exclusivity."<​ref>​Von Bruck, Michael (2001). ''​Canonicity and Divine Interference:​ The Tulkus and the Shugden-Controversy''​. Quoted in Dalmia, Vasudha; Malinar, Angelika; & Christof, Martin (2001). ''​Charisma and Canon: Essays on the Religious History of the Indian Subcontinent''​. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. p. 341.</​ref>​
 +
 +According to academic David Kay, in an account that has been much disputed by Gelugpa scholars: "As the Gelug agent of the Tibetan government in Kham (Khams) (Eastern Tibet), and in response to the ''​Rimed''​ movement that had originated and was flowering in that region, Phabongkha Rinpoche and his disciples employed repressive measures against non-Gelug sects. Religious artifacts associated with Padmasambhava – who is revered as a "​second Buddha"​ by Nyingma practitioners – were destroyed, and non-Gelug, and particularly Nyingma, monasteries were forcibly converted to the Gelug position. A key element of Phabongkha Rinpoche’s outlook was the cult of the protective deity Dorje Shugden, which he married to the idea of Gelug exclusivism and employed against other traditions as well as against those within the Gelug who had eclectic tendencies."<​ref>​Kay,​ D. N. (2004). ''​Tibetan and Zen Buddhism in Britain: Transplantation,​ development and adaptation''​. RoutledgeCurzon critical studies in Buddhism. London: RoutledgeCurzon. p. 86.</​ref> ​
 +
 +According to Kay, "His teaching tour of Kham in 1938 was a seminal phase, leading to a hardening of his exclusivism and the adoption of a militantly sectarian stance. In reaction to the flourishing Rimed movement and the perceived decline of Gelug monasteries in that region, Phabongkha and his disciples spearheaded a revival movement, promoting the supremacy of the Gelug as the only pure tradition."<​ref>​Kay,​ D. N. (2004). ''​Tibetan and Zen Buddhism in Britain: Transplantation,​ development and adaptation''​. RoutledgeCurzon critical studies in Buddhism. London: RoutledgeCurzon. p. 47.</​ref>​ Buddhist scholar [[Matthew Kapstein]] echoes these remarks, writing, "There has been a great deal of sectarian dispute among Tibetan refugees in India. Much of this has its roots in the works of Pha-bong-kha-pa Bde-chen snying-po (1878-1937),​ whose visions of the Dge-lugs-pa protective deity Rdo-rje shugs-ldan seem to have entailed a commitment to oppose actively the other schools of Tibetan Buddhism and the Bon-po."<​ref>"​The Purificatory Gem and Its Cleansing: A Late Tibetan Polemical Discussion of Apocryphal Texts" by Matthew Kapstein. ''​History of Religions'',​ Vol. 28, No. 3 (Feb., 1989), pp. 231 note 4</​ref>​
 +
 +However, most Gelug Lamas strongly dispute allegations against Pabongka'​s supposed wrong-doing. Some say that Je Phabongkhapa’s popularity made others jealous, serving as the basis of many rumors of sectarianism on his part against other Tibetan Buddhist schools. Responding to this allegation, [[Lama Zopa]] of the [[FPMT]] has said that criticism of Pabongka "​because he practiced Shugden, making him out to be some kind of demon" is misplaced because he:
 +<​blockquote>​
 +"wrote incredible teachings on [[sutra]] and [[tantra]]; on Heruka, Tara Cittamani and many other topics. All these amazing teachings were written purely from his experience. So it’s impossible that he can really be some kind of evil being, as those extremists accuse him of being. There’s no way he could have done the negative things they say he did."<​ref>​[http://​www.fpmt.org/​organization/​announcements/​shugden/​ILTKtalk-Thirdedit.pdf Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche, His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Shugden]</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +Regarding [[Kopan Monastery]] giving up [[Dorje Shugden]] practice, Lama Zopa also pointed out:
 +<​blockquote>​
 +This was done for His Holiness (The [[Dalai Lama]]). This does not mean that Pabongka Dechen Nyingpo, His Holiness [[Trijang Rinpoche]], and His Holiness Song Rinpoche have made mistakes. It does not mean they are wrong. Nor does one have to look at the protector as evil. For us ordinary people it is difficult to judge, because we cannot see these lamas ’ minds. Another side of the teaching is that it is mentioned that the protector ([[Dorje Shugden]]) is an Arya [[Bodhisattva]],​ a manifestation of [[Manjushri]]. So, then, there is also the risk of our creating very heavy karma in that context (by criticizing or abandoning this practice).<​ref>​Lama Zopa, [http://​www.lamayeshe.com/​index.php?​sect=article&​id=335 ''​Practice Advice : Dorje Shugden''​],​ Lama Zopa Rinpoche'​s Online Advice Book, retrieved 2009-02-12.</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +Geshe [[Kelsang Gyatso]] also rejected the rumors that Je Phabongkhapa was averse to the [[Nyingma]] tradition, saying:
 +<​blockquote>​
 +“Je Phabongkhapa had great devotion for [[Je Tsongkhapa]]. Je Tsongkhapa praised [[Padmasambhava]],​ so it is impossible for Je Phabongkhapa to show disrespect for Padmasambhava,​ impossible.”
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +[[Kyabje Zong Rinpoche]], a high ranking Lharampa [[Geshe]] and Abbot of Ganden Shartse,<​ref>​Wisdom:​ Magazine of the FPMT, Number 2, 1984</​ref>​ said in his teachings:<​blockquote>​
 +Kyabje Phabongka was also an emanation of Heruka Chakrasamvara,​ but degeneration of the times and jealousy of ordinary beings have made it difficult to become aware of his tremendous qualities. There are many biographies of Kyabje Phabongka that make his realized qualities very clear.<​ref>''​Chod in the Ganden Tradition'':​ The Oral Instructions of Kyabje Zong Rinpoche By Kyabje Zong Rinpoche Snow lion 2006</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +[[Kyabje Zong Rinpoche]] also explained the importance for Gelugpas of developing faith in the Gelugpa lineage passed down through Je Phabongkhapa and his principal disciple [[Trijang Rinpoche]]: <​blockquote>​
 +Kyabje Phabongka passed all of his lineages to Kyabje Trijang Dorje Chang. He often said this in discourses. The purpose of this detailed exposition is to affirm the power of the lineage. If we lose faith in the lineage, we are lost. We should remember the biographies of past and present teachers. We should never develop negative thoughts towards our root and lineage gurus. If we do not keep the commitments after having received teachings, this is a great downfall.”<​ref>''​Chod in the Ganden Tradition'':​ The Oral Instructions of Kyabje Zong Rinpoche By Kyabje Zong Rinpoche Snow Lion 2006</​ref>​
 +</​blockquote>​
 +
 +===Position on Bon religion===
 +Regarding Pabongka Rinpoche'​s attitude toward the non-Buddhist [[Bön]] religion, he said that "The dharmas of Boenpos, [[tirthika]]s,​ and so forth are non-Buddhist and should not be taken as our [[Refuge (Buddhism)|refuge]]."<​ref>''​Liberation in the palm of your hand: A concise discourse on the path to enlightenment''​ (2006). Boston: Wisdom Publications,​ p. 371.</​ref>​ In his famous work ''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand'',​ he calls it an "evil system",​ "false dharma",​ "not worthy of being a refuge",​ "​plagiarized",​ and "​invented"​.<​ref>''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand''​ by Pha-boṅ-kha-pa Byams-pa-bstan-ʼdzin-ʼphrin-las-rgya-mtsho Wisdom Publications,​ 2006
 +ISBN 0861715004,​[http://​books.google.com/​books?​id=KS2t0_OeusUC&​printsec=frontcover&​dq=liberation+palm#​PPA372,​M1]</​ref>​ Although the Bon religion was originally highly hostile to Buddhists,<​ref>​Chryssides,​ George (1999). ''​Exploring New Religions''​. London: Cassell. p. 242.</​ref>​ Je Phabongkhapa never advocated intolerance towards them: "Boen is not a refuge for Buddhists; it is not worthy of being a refuge. All the same, Buddhists and Boenpos say things to each other out of attachment or hostility, and this hardly makes for honest debate. It is vital that you should know the sources of the Boen religion."<​ref>''​Liberation in the palm of your hand: A concise discourse on the path to enlightenment''​ (2006). Boston: Wisdom Publications,​ p. 372.</​ref>​ To support his claim that Bon is not a fitting refuge for Buddhists, Je Phabongkhapa quoted several Buddhist scholars, including [[Milarepa]] who said, "The source of Boen is perverted Dharma. A creation of [[Nāga|nagas]] and powerful elementals, it does not take one to the ultimate path."<​ref>''​Liberation in the palm of your hand: A concise discourse on the path to enlightenment''​ (2006). Boston: Wisdom Publications,​ p. 373.</​ref>​
 +
 +==Death==
 +When Je Phabongkhapa died, an elaborate reliquary was constructed but the Chinese demolished it. Rilbur Rinpoche managed to retrieve some of his cremation relics ("ring sel") from it, which are usually kept at Sera Me Monastery. They are presently on the relics tour of saints and enlightened masters organized by Lama Zopa.<​ref>​[http://​www.maitreyaproject.org/​en/​relic/​gallery-pabonka.html The Maitreya Project] by the FPMT</​ref>​
 +
 +==Notes==
 +{{Reflist|2}}
 +
 +==Bibliography==
 +* ''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand'',​ Wisdom Publications
 +
 +==External links==
 +* [http://​community.palouse.net/​lotus/​tsp3.htm Lama Zasep Tulku Rinpoche discusses ''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand''​]
 +* [http://​www.dorjeshugden.com/​lineagemasters.htm ''​Photographs of the three incarnations of Kyabje Pabongka Dorje Chang''​] taken from DorjeShugden.com
 +* [http://​books.google.com/​books?​id=YMGaH09MSfQC&​dq=Pabongka%E2%80%99s+Liberation+in+the+Palm&​pg=PP1&​ots=V_wq6ZgAZ7&​source=bn&​sig=HcIi-vq61w3kqCSh-PBmIOigA28&​hl=en&​sa=X&​oi=book_result&​resnum=5&​ct=result#​PPA24,​M2 ''​Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand''​] (at Google Books)
 +* [http://​www.lamayeshe.com/​index.php?​sect=article&​id=430 ''​Heart Spoon''​ a teaching on impermanence by Kyabje Pabongka Dorje Chang]
 +* [http://​www.b-i-a.net/​pabongkha%20rinpoche.htm ''​Pabongkha Rinpoche''​] by Buddhist International Alliance.
 +
 +[[Category:​Lamas]]
 +
 +[[Category:​Tibetan Buddhists from Tibet]]
 +
 +[[Category:​Rinpoches]]
 +
 +[[Category:​Gelug Lamas]]
 +
 +[[de:​Phabongkha Dechen Nyingpo]]
 +[[zh:​帕繃喀仁波切]]
  
pabongka_rinpoche.txt · Last modified: 2018/02/26 18:12 (external edit)