six-session_guru_yoga_commentary_geshe_tashi_tsering_of_chenrezig_institute_15
Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

six-session_guru_yoga_commentary_geshe_tashi_tsering_of_chenrezig_institute_15 [2018/02/26 18:13] (current)
Line 1: Line 1:
 +** [[Ayurveda Healing Arts Institute]] of [[Medicine Buddha Healing Center]] **
 +** [[Nalanda University]] of [[Ayurveda]] and [[Buddhism]] **
 +
 +
 +[[Home]] | [[Clinic]] | [[Featured Content]] | [[Buddhist Ayurvedic Distance Learning |Distance Learning]] | [[About Us]] | [[Donate]] | [[Non-Profit]] | [[Recent Changes]] | Phone: 1-510-292-6696
 +
 +Part of the List of [[Dharma Terms]] and [[Fair Use]] [[Hyperlinked Shastra commentary]] ([[Non-Profit Educational Purposes for Distance Learning]]) from the [[Buddhist Ayurveda]] Course ([[SUT560]] [[Introduction to Tantra]] and [[SKT220]]) on [[Sanskrit Terms]] of [[Ayurveda]],​ [[Tibetan Medicine]], [[Dharma]] and [[CLN301|Consultations]]
 +----
 +
 +[[Buddhism Distance Learning]] | [[Ayurveda Distance Learning]]
 +
 +[[Recent Changes]] | [[Ayurveda Terms]] ([[Ayurvedic Chinese Western Medicine Terms from Marma Points of Ayurveda]] | [[Dharma Terms]] | [[Dharma Teachers]], See also [[Six Session Guru Yoga]], [[Extremely Abbreviated Six Session Guru Yoga]], [[Samaya]], [[Tantric Vows]], [[Puja]], [[Sadhana]]
 +
 +----
 +
 +======= Six-Session Guru Yoga Commentary by Geshe Tashi Tsering of Chenrezig Institute ======
 +
 +
 +For a formatted downloadable version, please see: 
 +
 +http://​www.ayurveda-california.com/​distance_learning/​index.php/​buddhist-masters-program/​six-session-guru-yoga/​6-session-guru-yoga-commentary-tashi-tsering-15
 +
 +----
 +
 +This transcription has been very lightly edited, and has not been checked by Ven. Lozang Zopa. All mistakes, omissions, additions, errors, erratic spelling and bizarre punctuation are due solely to the transcriber. ​
 +
 +
 +Six Session Guru Yoga.
 +
 +
 +Teacher:​ Geshe Tashi Tsering
 +Translator:​ Ven. Lozang Zopa
 +Transcribed:​ Carolyn McLeod
 +Chenrezig Institute; 22nd April, 2003
 +
 +Tape 15.
 +
 +In general, the mind of enlightenment has two aspects; the aspiring mind of enlightenment and the engaging mind of enlightenment. Awakening the aspiring mind of enlightenment refers to developing the mind that thinks; 'I will attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings'​. The engaging mind of enlightenment corresponds to one’s thoughts, or the actions that one does, in order to attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings, or one might say, I am performing generosity and so on and so forth to attain that goal. 
 +
 +The engaging mind of enlightenment is the awakening mind that is directly influenced by the fervent mindfulness and aspiration that strives for the resultant knower of all aspects or omniscience. Whereas, the awakening mind that is not directly or explicitly influenced by such aspirations and mindfulness is the aspiring mind of enlightenment. ​
 +
 +There’s also an aspiring mind of enlightenment that includes a promise. This promise refers to the commitment or the promise that one makes in the context of a ritual. Where one says, ‘I am going to attain enlightenment for the benefit of all sentient beings, and from this day until that occurs, I will not forsake the mind of enlightenment’. Geshe-la points out that rather than say, ‘I will not forsake the mind of enlightenment’,​ we should say, ‘I will not forsake this mind’, because properly speaking, it’s not the mind of enlightenment just yet, it'​s’ still a contrived mind. We’re still training in the subjective aspect and the focus of the mind of enlightenment. So, one is saying, ‘I will attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings and from this day, until I attain enlightenment,​ I will not forsake this mind – this intention.’
 +
 +In fact, this is what we need to develop; this is what we need to improve upon – this mind.
 +
 +This aspiring mind of enlightenment,​ which comes together with a promise, has certain trainings and advice that correspond to it. On page nine of the translation it reads: - in addition, the following faults contradict the advice and trainings of aspirational bodhicitta. They are called ‘secondary offences’ of aspirational bodhicitta. ​
 +
 +1. Not giving Dharma and material goods to those who are worthy of being given Dharma and material goods. This word, worthy, can also be translated as appropriate or suitable.
 +2. Holding grudges against those who cause harm and being biased and attached to some and averse to others.
 +3. Not relying on the sublime and discarding study, reflection and meditation.
 +
 +4. Not being influenced by the thought to benefit others while partaking of food and clothing.
 +5. Not acting to influence all virtuous activities with the awakening mind. 
 +
 +When a person gets ordained and takes the vows of a renunciant, the vows of a monk or a nun, they are encouraged to live in the vicinity of a lama. They do so to prevent their vows from degenerating. To say, you live in the vicinity of a lama, is shorthand for saying that you should live close to a lama so that you can correspond with them on what is appropriate for you to do, or you want to be sure that you do not transgress from the trainings and the vows that you have taken. Living in the vicinity of a lama helps an ordained person to keep the vows without degeneration. This is encouraged for the newly ordained, and it's said in the texts that they should stay in the vicinity of a lama for ten or five years. ​
 +
 +Similarly, number three speaks about not relying on the sublime and discarding study, reflection and meditation. Here we have similar advice being given in the context of the Bodhisattva Vows, for if you were not to rely on the sublime as a teacher who can tell you what type of behaviour is inappropriate with respect to the vows, there’s a danger that those vows degenerate. Similarly, if you were to discard study, reflection and meditation, you run the same risk. It’s a secondary offence of the aspirational bodhicitta together with its promise not to rely on the sublime and discard study, reflection and meditation. ​
 +
 +Number 4 reads: - Not being influenced by the thought to benefit others while partaking of food and clothing. Similarly, when we receive such things and make use of them, we should ensure that we have the thought to benefit others. Given that we are trying to practice the Mahayana Dharma and make our activities conform to that, then we should influence all our virtuous activities with the awakening mind. Whether a virtuous activity is minor or a major one, it should always be influenced by the mind of enlightenment. ​
 +
 +Next the text reads: - To avoid being separated from the mind of enlightenment in future lives you must adopt the four white Dharmas and abandon the four black Dharmas.
 +Given that we are making the promise to work to attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all, then it's important that we practice the mind of enlightenment,​ not only in this lifetime but in future lifetimes. In order to ensure that we are able to practice the mind of enlightenment in future lifetimes, we adopt the four white Dharmas and abandon the four black Dharmas, which are explained in the following section. ​
 + 
 +1. The first black Dharma is to knowingly deceive a lama or object of worship and so forth. Its antidote, the first white Dharma, is to refrain from intentionally speaking deceptive falsehoods to all sentient beings, even for the sake of eliciting laughter. Is that clear? Geshe-la in English: looks like everyone tired. If you tired, then we stop. My eyes tired, then you look like you tired.
 +2. The second black Dharma is to cause others to regret their virtuous actions. ​
 +We need to be particularly careful when we are speaking to others about the way practices are done, the steps that are followed and the procedure that is appropriate in carrying out a particular activity. If, for instance, someone is doing something and we were to just rush out and say, ‘No, no, you are doing it all wrong. It should be done like this’, there’s the danger that the person regrets what they have done and it might be that they were accomplishing some virtue in doing that. Thinking that, ‘oh no, I’ve made a mistake, I’ve stuffed it all up’, causes them to regret having performed virtue, which is quite a serious negativity. We need to be careful when speaking about such things with others. It might be that there’s no need to point out a mistake that we suspect has been done. 
 +
 +If it is quite an important point. However, you should be skilful in the way you address the mistake that is being made. To illustrate this point, Geshe-la has told a story that some of you may be familiar with. 
 +
 +There’s this person who was doing circumambulation and His Holiness, from up in the Potala Palace, saw that this person had a white umbrella above them. His Holiness, being quite impressed, said to his attendants, ‘go down and get that person, I want to speak to them and see what they are doing’. The person comes up and His Holiness asks the person, ‘what are you doing?’ he answers, ‘nothing special, I’m just making prayers to the White Umbrella deity’. His Holiness says, ‘Let’s hear you do it then’. The person begins to recite the prayer, mispronouncing all over the place and there were some major pronunciation errors taking place. His Holiness though, ‘If this person gets the White Umbrella over their head and they are making all these mistakes in pronunciation,​ well think about what would happen if they were to pronounce it correctly’. With that thought, His Holiness proceeded to correct the person’s pronunciation and sent them off again. The person goes around, and there’s no White Umbrella over their head. His Holiness brings the person back up and says; ‘What I said was not alright, forget it, you go back to saying it the way you were’; they go down and, sure enough, the White umbrella appears above their head.
 +
 +The person regretted the fact that they had been making these mistakes in pronunciation and that prevented the White Umbrella from appearing above their head. This story is presented as being a very sound source; Geshe-la is chuckling, saying whether you actually would find this related in texts, he’s not sure, but it’s presented as being something that actually occurred when they teach the lam rim.  ​
 +
 +Different lamas have different things they do and different ways about doing a ritual, so we can’t so easily, say ‘what you are doing is incorrect; this is the way it should be done.’ We speak about it as if it was simple and straight forward like that, but it isn’t always simple and straight forward. We should be quite careful- ​ not be too hasty – in correcting a person. ​
 +
 +The antidote to the second black Dharma is the fourth white Dharma: - Its antidote, the fourth white Dharma, is to cause mature sentient beings to embrace complete enlightenment and not establish them in the Hinayana vehicle. ​
 +
 +The translation doesn’t capture all of the Tibetan because the Tibetan states that the person in question is one that you, yourself, have brought to fruition – you, yourself, has helped to mature. When you are dealing a person who places their confidence in you, in such a case, when a person places their confidence in you, rather than establish them in the Hinayana vehicle, you aught to cause them to embrace the Mahayana, for that would be of greater benefit. You should cause them to embrace complete enlightenment.
 +
 +The third black Dharma is to express unpleasant things, out of anger, to Bodhisattvas. Its antidote, the third white Dharma, is to cultivate the attitude that all sentient beings are teachers, and train in pure perception.
 +
 +Geshe-la points out that although there’s a spelling error in the Tibetan, the reading it as training in pure perception, is correct. ​
 +
 +The fourth black Dharma is to act with cunning and deceit, without the highest intention, toward any sentient being. ​
 +
 +If one acts in such a way with the highest intention, that’s another matter. ​
 +
 +Its antidote is the second white Dharma and that is to be honest, without cunning and deceit, in your intentions towards all sentient beings. ​
 +
 +This section that we have just gone through is the section that deals with the way to prevent the vows that have been attained from degenerating. ​
 +
 +Thirdly we deal with what you should do if the vows degenerate. Thirdly, should they degenerate, the way to restore the vows is as follows: You need to retake the vows when you incur a root downfall through Discarding aspirational bodhicitta, Holding wrong views or performing a root downfall in which the four binding afflictions are complete. Geshe-la has already explained what these four binding afflictions are; you can find them on pages 3 and 4.
 +
 +The vows could be retaken if you incur either of these two root downfalls – discarding aspirational bodhicitta, holding wrong views, or if you perform a root downfall in which the four binding afflictions are complete. Secondary offences of medium contamination must be acknowledged in the presence of at least three people, while secondary offences of lesser contamination and the forty-six secondary offences must be acknowledged in the presence of one person. Any secondary offence, other than those just mentioned, are best acknowledged in the presence of another. Otherwise, you should acknowledge them in the presence of a holy image, such as a statue, while imagining that you are confessing in the presence of the victor and his children – the conqueror. ​
 +
 +If you transgress or contravene the Bodhisattva Vows, you can indeed take them again as clearly indicated by the statement of what to do should you incur a root downfall. A similar thing is true for the vows of approaching virtue, the lay person’s vows. If an individual transgressed one of the four root vows they can still retake those vows. 
 +
 +What follows in the Tibetan text is a rather long section dealing with what to recite and what to do in the process of restoring and purifying. It draws on different types of texts; in essence it draws upon confessing and purifying through application of the four antidotal powers, and is perhaps not so important for us to cover at the moment. ​
 +
 +You are all familiar with the practice of so jong, the restoration and purification ceremony? When the Great Restoration and Purification ceremony is performed at Gyume, one of the tantric colleges, then they do a recitation of restoring the Bodhisattva and the mantra vows. Normally at Sera, when the Restoration and Purification is done, they don’t include the extra corresponding to the Bodhisattvas and mantra vows. The most important point is to confess and purify through application of the four opponent powers.  ​
 +
 +Student. If a person breaks the vows of approaching virtue, do they have to take them again in the presence of a lama to restore them or can they do something themselves to restore them?
 +Geshe-la. You have to take the vows again anew – you can’t take the vows of approaching virtue in the presence of a statue.
 +
 +Moving on to the section on the mantra vows. Once again there are four in the section.
 +
 +The means by which a person who has not obtained the secret mantra vows attains them; the way to guard the vows against degeneration;​ the way to restore them should they degenerate and the benefits and advantages of guarding the vows.  ​
 +
 +To have the vows of mantra, you have to have received empowerment in either Highest Yoga Tantra or Yoga Tantra. In receiving an action or performance tantra empowerment,​ you don’t have to take the vows. The mantra vows have to be taken when you are going to receive a Vajra Master empowerment. A Vajra Master empowerment is only found in Yoga and Highest Yoga Tantra sections. We’ve studied this before. We know that the action and performance Tantras only have certain empowerments that are included within the greater empowerment,​ known as the Vase empowerment. The action tantra will have the water empowerment and the crown empowerment,​ where as performance tantra will have the empowerment of the five families and so forth. Thus, it’s only in taking the Yoga tantra or Highest Yoga Tantra empowerment that an individual receives the mantra vow.  ​
 +
 +1. The method, or means by which, for those who have not obtained the vows of secret mantra to obtain them. Having properly trained in the common paths, please a qualified Vajra Master in the three ways to please the guru, then steadfastly request and take the vows. 
 +
 +3. The way to guard the vows against degeneration. Learn the samaya and precepts of the vows by properly relying on a qualified Vajra Master. In particular you should see the lama who is bestowed empowerment,​ explained the Tantras or given pith instructions to you, as the foundation of all accomplishments. Prostrate and offer mandalas and flowers six times every day; properly listen to and explain the dharma; respect and praise the master; practice as the lama intended; offer attractive articles; always guard the samaya; always make offerings to the Sugatas and always make offerings to the lama; regard the lama as being indivisible from Vajradhara; do not walk over the lama’s shadow, shoes, seat of mount etc., practice in accord with his instructions. Where an apology is appropriate,​ apologise for those things that you are incapable of, protect the lamas goods as you would your life, consider the lama’s retinue to be kin, do not sit on a bed in the presence of a lama; do not go in front of the lama without a purpose; do not place your feet on a seat before the lama ; be conscientious in the way you move your limbs in front of the lama; rise quickly when the lama is getting up; do not spit and so on in the presence of the lama; help him stretch his stiff legs, help propagate his words, massage his limbs, refrain from singing, dancing and playing music and expressing degrading things or saying degrading things; do not sit or rise in a disrespectful way in the presence of the lama.
 +
 +Do not rise or sit in a disrespectful way in the presence of the lama; refrain from contorting your body, leaning against pillars and so forth and counting on your fingers when in the presence of the lama; wipe the dirt from the lama’s body; brush the seat and so forth clean before and after he uses it. So that others may develop respect, include special words such as, ‘in the past he has said’; when you mention the lama by name – in the Tibetan you have a whole system of honorific language which doesn’t always come through, but to refer to your lama in an honorific way when mentioning him by name. Cover your mouth with your hand when laughing or coughing; regardless of the activity being performed, once it is finished, communicate that it is so in a gentle way; sit peacefully and calmly in front of the lama; wear appropriate clothing; when listening to dharma, request him to teach three times with hands joined while kneeling; act gently and conscientiously without being prideful and coy; if you are in the vicinity of the lama and have not received permission refrain from performing mandala acts, concentration,​ gathering students, explaining dharma and acting as if the lama’s students were your own; if you’ve received his permission, offer any offerings received from concentration etc with open eyes; if a lama returns an offering, do as you like with it; make offerings to masters and lamas; when they give something to you, offer or take it respectfully with both hands; when in the presence of the lama, do not let others prostrate to you; apply yourself to all appropriate and upstanding behaviour so that when your Vajra siblings transgress such upstanding conduct you can take measures to turn them away from such behaviour with a pleasant attitude. It's very important to rely on the lama in this way. Without exception, it is a source of all accomplishment. If you do not rely on the lama in the proper way or abuse or belittle him, it is a root downfall of abusing and belittling the Vajra Master.  ​
 +
 +To transgress the above advice on how to rely upon a lama is a gross violation.
 +
 +The above advice, which takes up a page an a half, is drawn from the Fifty Verses of Guru Devotion by Aryashura and the Presentation of Root Downfalls by Lama Tsong Khapa.
 +
 +Student. When it says, with open eyes is it actually a reference to an offering received for opening the eyes of a statue. [End side a]
 +Geshe-la. Do you understand the immediately preceding one, which speaks about if you don't have permission when you are in the vicinity of the lama, then you should refrain from performing mandalas, acts of consecration,​ gathering students, explaining Dharma and acting as if the lama’s students are your own. That’s clear? ​
 +
 +It is indeed a reference to the eye opening ceremony, thank you – it’s good that you pointed that out. There are different forms of consecration,​ it doesn’t necessarily involve opening the eyes of a statue; for instance, there is the eye medicine, application of the eye medicine and so forth. ​
 +
 +This phrase, opening the eyes, can be understood as part of a consecration in which the eyes of as statue are painted as being opened. In which case, a lot of fan fare is usually attached to that in traditional Tibetan culture. There are other instances of eye opening, for instance, with the application of eye medicine, you might have a self entry or an empowerment and so on and so forth. Here, it does seem to be a reference to an eye opening ceremony done as part of a consecration. Traditionally in Tibet, when this type of thing was going to be done, the sponsors would invite lamas and the artists to the place and make fairly substantial offerings; they regarded this as a very auspicious occasion and therefore, a big deal was made out of it. When one is invited to such an occasion and the offerings you receive should be passed on to the lama – this is offerings made in the context of an eye opening ceremony as part of a consecration. If the lama then returns those offerings to you, you can do as you wish with them. 
 +
 +If you return to the beginning of the section, it reads: - In particular, you should see the lama who has bestowed empowerment,​ explained the Tantras or given pith instructions to you as the foundation of all accomplishments. These three are the three kindnesses of the tantric guru. When you speak about the lama who is kind in three ways, it's the lama who does these three things as explained in Lama Chopa – Guru Puja.
 +
 +The section we are coming up to returns to the root text of the Six Session Guru Yoga, Despising or belittling my guru; Disregarding any practice and so forth. However, the translation differs because the Tibetan is slightly different, so I’ll read off each of the root texts.
 +
 +When the first root downfall in our commentary reads: - Abusing and belittling the Vajra Master it’s referring to abusing and belittling the lama. Although it says Vajra Master, you should know it refers to the lama – the guru.
 +
 +Student. Inaudible – not repeated by Ven. Lozang Zopa.
 +Geshe-la. The three related to sutra are, giving commentary; transmissions and vows. 
 +
 +If you knowingly act in disregard in a way contrary to any one of the teachings of the three sets of vows you possess, it is a root downfall of violating the violating the Sugata’s precepts, or, disregarding any practice. Disregarding or ignoring the practice. ​
 +
 +That’s how the Six Session Guru Yoga describes it; the actual name of the downfall is violating the Sugata’s precepts. In general, to violate – that is transgress, the Sugata’s precepts, doesn’t necessarily mean disregarding or ignoring them – does it? Have you necessarily disregarded or ignored a percept if you have transgressed them? Have you necessarily disregarded or ignored the precepts of the Sugata if you’ve transgressed them? 
 +Student. Inaudible and not repeated by Ven. Lozang Zopa. 
 +Geshe-la. Sure. An example please.
 +Student. You know them very well but you transgressed them.
 +Geshe-la. If while you understand them you still transgress them this is leaning towards disregarding or ignoring them, isn’t it. However, alternatively,​ if you don’t know them or understand them, and you transgress them – in fact, we do this all the time, don’t we – being ignorant in respect to the precepts, we transgress them. In this case, out of ignorance, transgressing them has nothing to do with disregarding or ignoring them.
 +But if you understand them and then you transgress them, then this is really transgressing or ignoring them? If you do not know what you are transgressing,​ are you disregarding or ignoring them?
 +Geshe-la in English: - one time we had been to the beach or something, Tenzin Sherab from Dharamsala, here translating. [?] going New Zealand because of a problem with passport – he here one week, two weeks; translate. For this time in the car, we going beach looking. When come back time, we drink cocoa cola. This time a wooden bridge, I cocoa cola already drink then I finished it and tossed it out the window as we were going over the bridge because it looked like a rubbish tip. There’s a little gully and there was a lot of rubbish in there – it looked like a rubbish tip. Kathy very surprised! Then Tenzin Sherab pointed out that you are not allowed to throw things out like that, that there’s proper places to throw things away. I wasn’t disregarding the laws of Australia, I simply didn’t know about them. 
 +
 +If, knowing it was an inappropriate thing to do, you were to still throw it out the window that would be disregarding. Knowingly doing transgressing is probably disregarding.
 +
 +Geshe-la has basically raised an issue for debate. The name of this root downfall is Violating the Sugata’s precepts; it's referred to in Six Session Guru Yoga as, Disregarding any practice. The question is, if something is in violation of the Sugata’s precepts, does it necessarily involve disregard, or, could you perhaps violate the Sugata’s precepts without knowing? If you were to do so, would it be a root downfall? It follows that it is a root downfall because it's in violation of the Sugata’s precepts. How do you respond? Perhaps you respond by saying, ‘the assumption is that there is disregard involved in the violation.’
 +
 +Littering, if you don’t know that you’re not supposed to litter, probably isn’t a root downfall. ​
 +
 +Number three reads: - If you angrily criticise a Vajra sibling, who possesses vows and who has received an empowerment of any one of the four classes of tantra from the same lama as yourself, it is the root downfall of Being angry with your Vajra sibling.
 +It mentions a Vajra sibling who possesses vows and who has received an empowerment of any one of the four classes of tantra from the same lama – you don’t have to have received the empowerment at the same time, it might be that the other person received empowerment,​ took vows of mantra from the lama at some point in the past, then you come along and you take the mantra vows and empowerment from the same lama, which makes you two Vajra siblings. It also points out that such a person possesses the mantra vows; in addition to having received empowerment of any one of the four classes of tantra from the same lama and possesses vows.
 +
 +The name of this downfall is Being angry with a Vajra sibling, but the explanation seems to imply that you angrily criticise this Vajra sibling. Is merely becoming angry with a Vajra sibling a cause of this root downfall of Being angry with a Vajra sibling? What is the name of this root downfall? It follows that being angry with a Vajra sibling does constitute this root downfall, because the root downfall is being angry with a Vajra sibling. Do you have to angrily criticise or can you merely just be angry? Is just being angry with a Vajra sibling this root downfall? The name given in the text is, Being angry with a Vajra sibling. In Six Session Guru Yoga, it's Speaking badly of my Vajra brothers. ​
 +
 +According to the Six Session Guru Yoga then, you must necessarily criticise. In order to express criticism you have to say something don’t you – not just be angry but express criticism. ​
 +
 +You’re dealing with a Vajra sibling who possesses the vows and who has received an empowerment of any one of the four classes of tantra, the mantra vows are only given in Yoga and Highest Yoga Tantra – that still stands. In order to incur this root downfall of being angry with a Vajra sibling, you must angrily criticise the Vajra sibling, because it says in Six Session Guru Yoga, expressing criticism of my Vajra brothers - Speaking badly of my Vajra brothers. ​
 +
 +Vajra brother, Vajra sibling – it's the same thing as in child of the conqueror, does it have to be son of the conqueror – it's obviously not gender specific. ​
 +
 +Number four: - If, in relation to any sentient being you think, ‘I wish that person were not happy,’ it is the root downfall of abandoning loving- kindness for sentient beings. ​
 +
 +In fact it might be more accurate to say, If, in relation to any single sentient being you think, ‘I wish that person were not happy,’ it is the root downfall of abandoning loving- kindness for sentient beings. ​
 +
 +You would think that in becoming angry with another, you are wishing that person were not happy – correct? There’s a danger that in becoming angry, you are incurring a root downfall of mantra. ​
 +
 +Number five reads: - If you give up aspirational bodhicitta thinking, ‘how could I ever attain enlightenment for the benefit of sentient beings,’ it is a root downfall of giving up bodhicitta. ​
 +
 +If you sincerely disparage any teaching of the conqueror included in the three vehicles saying, ‘this is not a dharma talk by the Buddha’, it is a root downfall of Belittling one’s own and others tenants.
 +
 +This is not merely making an offhanded remark about something, rather it's sincerely disparaging. ​
 +
 +Number seven reads: - If you divulge any mantra secret like the deity yoga attitude to a person who has not been rendered a suitable vessel by receiving a qualified empowerment and he or she understands the meaning, it is the root downfall of divulging the secret teaching to the spiritually immature. ​
 +
 +We are rendered suitable vessels by receiving qualified empowerment – hence the word empowered because being empowered, we become a suitable vessel. The practice of mantra is something that is to be kept secret; it's not something that we should make a big show about, hence, secret mantra. To go about speaking about mantra things to someone who has not received such an empowerment and therefore, does not have such a good understanding of this material, is inappropriate;​ for, if they understand what we are speaking about, we incur the root downfall.
 +
 +I forgot to translate something that Geshe-la said: - we really should take this root downfall seriously and not divulge secret teachings to the spiritually immature. Once again, Geshe-la said that another name for Tantra is secret mantra, which indicates that it is something that should be practiced in a secret or hidden way. 
 +
 +The need for secrecy and keeping it hidden has nothing to do with a fault that mantra possesses – that’s not the case. The need for keeping it secret and hidden has to do with the fact that there are those who have no faith and those who are unsuitable receptacles for such teachings. It's not with a fault in the teaching itself but with certain qualities of the other person.
 +
 +Of course it goes without saying that we should not speak about mantra topics with those who have not received empowerment. But even when you are speaking with somebody who says they have received empowerment but obviously have not reached a mature stage with that, don’t have a very good understanding of it, it's best not to speak about it with them also. This is revealing secrets to those who are unripe in the Six Session Guru Yoga. 
 +
 +The next according to Six Session Guru Yoga is abusing my own aggregates, and it reads: - giving that you should meditate on your aggregates as being in the nature of the five Buddhas, if you were to abuse your aggregates saying, ‘it is inappropriate to meditate on these unclean aggregates suffering as being a Buddha’, or, if intending to damage your aggregated you damage them by depriving yourself of food and so forth, it is the root downfall of abusing and belittling the aggregates. ​
 +
 +There are two different types being identified in the commentary. The first is saying that it's not appropriate to meditate on these aggregates as being in the nature of a Buddha because this is an impure, unclean body, isn’t it. If you think this, this is to incur the root downfall of belittling the aggregates.
 +
 +If, after meditating on the unpleasant aspects of the human body, you attempt to damage your aggregates by depriving yourself of food and so forth, it is the root downfall of abusing your aggregates.
 +
 +In teaching the conduct that is free of attachment, you’ll find teachings about the unpleasant aspects of the human body. Those types of meditations are encouraged to counteract attachment. Counteracting attachment is a very important thing. However, in mantra practice, it's also very important to have a stable and reliable body, so you don’t want to allow your body to waste away either for a stable body is a help to progressing in the practice. So if after meditating on the unpleasant aspects of the human form, if you were to attempt to damage your aggregates by depriving them of food thinking, ‘oh, this impure body must waste away‘, or something to this effect, you would incur this root downfall. ​
 +
 +We will leave it there for this evening. ​
 +
 +Despising and belittling my guru;
 +Disregarding any practice;
 +Speaking badly of my Vajra brothers;
 +Abandoning love for any being;
 +Giving up wishing and entering bodhicitta;
 +Scorning the teachings of sutra and mantra;
 +Revealing secrets to those who are unripe;
 +Abusing my own aggregates. ​
 +
 +Student. What does, like a deity yoga attitude mean?
 +Geshe-la. First of all, Geshe-la would like to establish the basic fact that there are such people who have not been rendered suitable vessels by receiving a qualified empowerment who still might understand the meaning.
 +
 +It’s an error in the translation;​ the word attitude literally should be discerned. The phrase in Tibetan is less restricted than saying knowing, and hence discerned is probably a better translation. As Geshe-la has just pointed out, you might discern or determine that this person has been rendered a suitable vessel by receiving qualified empowerment,​ and, on that basis, you then divulge mantra secrets. In that case, you wouldn’t incur a root downfall would you, because you divulged those secrets while having determined that the person is a suitable vessel? ​
 +
 +If, however, you consider the person and think they are not a suitable vessel; that they are not an appropriate receptacle for whatever reason, and knowing that and making such an assessment of the person you proceed to divulge secrets, you would incur the root downfall. ​
 +
 +Geshe-la’s commentary is pointing out that for someone to be a qualified vessel doesn’t just meant hat they have received empowerment. You could encounter a person, who has received empowerment but no longer has any faith in mantra and in fact criticises and denigrates mantra, but you know that this is the case; you’ve determined they are such a person, yet you continue to speak about mantra topics with them, then you incur this root downfall. If, however, your assessment is such that, ‘this person has faith in mantra’, and you divulge secrets, you would not incur the root downfall because you spoke about those topics under the assumption that they had faith, when in fact, they did not.
 +
 +Student. Some students around the centre seem to be interested in learning about Vajrasattva practice. Where do we draw the line? It seems that Vajrasattva practice is taught quite openly.
 +Geshe-la. It’s difficult to really say so we have to rely on logic and reasoning. It's possible that a person can have faith in a deity such as Vajrasattva even though they have not received empowerment. [End of tape] 
  
six-session_guru_yoga_commentary_geshe_tashi_tsering_of_chenrezig_institute_15.txt · Last modified: 2018/02/26 18:13 (external edit)