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 +Part of the List of [[Dharma Terms]] and [[Fair Use]] [[Hyperlinked Shastra commentary]] ([[Non-Profit Educational Purposes for Distance Learning]]) from the [[Buddhist Ayurveda]] Course ([[SUT560]] [[Introduction to Tantra]] and [[SKT220]]) on [[Sanskrit Terms]] of [[Ayurveda]],​ [[Tibetan Medicine]], [[Dharma]] and [[CLN301|Consultations]]
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 +[[Recent Changes]] | [[Ayurveda Terms]] ([[Ayurvedic Chinese Western Medicine Terms from Marma Points of Ayurveda]] | [[Dharma Terms]] | [[Dharma Teachers]], See also [[Six Session Guru Yoga]], [[Extremely Abbreviated Six Session Guru Yoga]], [[Samaya]], [[Tantric Vows]], [[Puja]], [[Sadhana]]
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 +======= Six-Session Guru Yoga Commentary by Geshe Tashi Tsering of Chenrezig Institute ======
 +
 +
 +For a formatted downloadable version, please see: 
 +
 +http://​www.ayurveda-california.com/​distance_learning/​index.php/​buddhist-masters-program/​six-session-guru-yoga/​6-session-guru-yoga-commentary-tashi-tsering-17
 +
 +----
 +This transcription has been very lightly edited, and has not been checked by Ven. Lozang Zopa. All mistakes, omissions, additions, errors, erratic spelling and bizarre punctuation are due solely to the transcriber. ​
 +
 +
 +Six Session Guru Yoga.
 +
 +
 +Teacher:​ Geshe Tashi Tsering
 +Translator:​ Ven. Lozang Zopa
 +Transcribed:​ Carolyn McLeod
 +Chenrezig Institute. 6th May, 2003.
 +
 +Tape 17. Last teaching.
 +
 +We are at the third of the eight gross violations. In the Six Session Guru Yoga it's referred to Showing ​ secret substances to a unsuitable vessel, whereas in this commentary it reads: - If you show a mantra painting, text, vajra, bell, the six ornaments, hand mudras or practices etc to someone who has not received empowerment or to someone who has  received empowerment but has no faith in mantra is a gross violation of showing secret substances to an unfit vessel . There is a danger of this, isn’t there?
 +
 +The point is for us to take care. The worse would be to show these things to people who have no faith. It is important not to openly display these things to people who have not obtained empowerment,​ but to show these to a person without faith could lead to incurring a very serious negativity. ​
 +
 +When the text refers to those without faith, it's referring to those who dislike mantra and the associated things. There are people who have faith and people who have no faith, it's quite a broad category; of those people who have no faith there might be some who don’t have any particular interest and those who have an active dislike for mantra. Here, when we speak about those with no faith, we are speaking about those with an active dislike for it. 
 +
 +Number four reads: - If you quarrel, even just in jest or by striking your palms, when a feast gathering of a Vira or Virihni’s feast is being properly offered, it is a gross violation of Quarrelling during a feast gathering.
 +
 +A few weeks ago Geshe-la explained the differences between a feast gathering and a Vira’s feast and a Virihni’s feast. He mentioned that when you have male and female together offering tsog you have a feast gathering; whereas when you have all males offering such tsog you have a Vira’s feast, and when you have all females offering you have a Virihni’s feast or tsog.
 +
 +It's inappropriate to fight or quarrel during such a time regardless of the composition of the participants. Number five reads: If you knowingly answer improperly when a person who is a suitable vessel asks a meaningful question about dharma it is a gross violation of teaching another dharma to the faithful.
 +
 +In Six Session Guru Yoga this is referred to as giving false answers to sincerely asked questions.
 +
 +To say, ‘I don’t know’, when you do not actually know is not giving a false or incorrect answer. To respond, ‘I don't know’, when you do know, is a fault. It is quite clear what this is referring to. 
 +
 +Number six is phrased as follows in Six Session Guru Yoga: - Staying more than a week in the home of a shravaka. Here it reads: - If, for no particular purpose, you spend seven days amongst Hearers who repudiate mantra, it is a gross violation of spending seven days amongst Hearers.
 +
 +It mentions repudiating mantra, which of course refers to somebody who lacks faith in the sense of having an active dislike for mantra, would repudiate mantra. Basically, it's referring to somebody who doesn’t accept mantra or the Mahayana teaching. There are those Hearer practitioners who wouldn’t accept the validity of the mantra teachings. To stay, for no particular purpose, in the homes of such people could result in the gross violation of spending seven days amongst hearers. There might, however, be a purpose to staying with them. There might be a person who is on the verge of entering into the Mahayana and if they were to receive the right guidance, they could very easily be steered in that direction. In that case, there is a purpose or a need for staying with such people, in which chase the gross violation does not occur. ​
 +
 +It's clear that staying more than a week in the home of a shravaka refers to staying more than a week in the home of a shravaka who repudiates mantra for no purpose. The explanation itself it quite clear. Moving on :- 
 +
 +Boasting that I am a yogi although I am not, which is explained in the commentary like this - If, despite the fact that you do not understand the essence of the deity or mantra, you maintain that you are a yogi simply because you have meditated on a single deity sadhana or have spend a single session focused upon the generation or completion stage, it is a gross violation of pretending to be a yogi.
 +
 +There is a mistake in the spelling of the Tibetan and it shouldn’t read diligent, according to the mistake that Geshe-la has pointed out; it should be falsely pretending to be a yogi.
 +
 +The wording of the Tibetan includes this phrase, [?] which is translated here as essence. As in the first line it reads the essence of the deity or mantra. In most contexts when we see this word [?] it refers to suchness, which is a synonym for emptiness. It's referring to the nature or the state of things. Geshe-la recalls this phrasing being called into question because, what is the essence or the suchness of the deity and does that differ from the essence of mantra? Geshe-la recalls this question being addressed in the text known as The Lamp Illuminating the Five Stages. In that, the implication is that the essence of the deity refers to deity yoga and the essence of mantra is the essence of mantra a term that does, indeed, carry some ambiguity. Translating it as essence is fine because it retains that ambiguity. The sort of term which Geshe-la is mentioning [?] which is translated as the way of being, or the mode of being, or the nature – the state of-something. A deity has two modes of being; it has a relative mode of being and an ultimate mode of being. When you refer to a deity’s mode of being, you could be referring to either of them; the term is ambiguous isn’t it. If you understand the essence of the deity, what do you understand?
 +Potentially you could be speaking about the relative nature of the deity or the ultimate nature of the deity. ​
 +
 +Once again, the spelling error in Tibetan came through in English also so it should be falsely pretending to be a yogi as opposed to falsely pretending to be a diligent yogi.
 +
 +Number eight reads: - If you divulge secrets to someone who has received empowerments but has no faith in mantra, it is a gross violation of revealing secrets to those without faith.
 +
 +There is some superficial resemblance to the third gross violation isn’t there? The difference is that in the third we are dealing with showing secret substances and in the eighth we are dealing with revealing secrets. It's inappropriate to speak about the way to practice mantra with those who have not received empowerment or with those who have received empowerment but do not have faith in that. The most important in this case is to refrain from speaking about such things with those who have no faith. ​
 +
 +In Six Session Guru Yoga it is referred to as teaching the sacred dharma to those with no faith. These are the eight gross violations that are also covered in the Six Session Guru Yoga. It's a fairly standard presentation. ​
 +
 +A great master, [?] then added two gross violations to the eight, making ten, so we find ten in Six Session Guru Yoga. They read: - conferring mandala rites without full preparation and needlessly breaking the pratimoksha or bodhicitta vows.  ​
 +
 +This text is riddled, as you probably remember from last week and the week before, with spelling mistakes and it makes for some rather funny reading. ​
 +
 +There is a statement that follows the list of eight, which says: - the gross violation of teaching secrets to someone who does not have the fortune, in the sense that he or she has not been properly prepared, has been explained above. So we don’t need to discuss that. 
 +
 +Geshe-la has just mentioned how this great master added two gross violations. This is what we find next under the heading, Other violations.
 +
 +The first reads: - To bestow empowerment,​ perform the self entry or consecrations that require you to have done so without having first completed and formed the [? Unclear and have no copy of the text] approach on the central deity of the mandala and his retinue, which includes the amending fire puja or having received the deity’s permission, is a gross violation of performing mandala activities and so forth without properly doing the approach.
 +
 +To bestow empowerment,​ to perform the self entry or to do consecrations that require you to have gone through a certain process when you have not first completed a {?} approach on the central deity is inappropriate – it's a gross violation. ​
 +
 +According to the rules of Gyume Tantric College, you can only act as a Vajra Master for a consecration if you have completed the approach together with the fire puja. That’s not to say that all of the monks at Gyume Tantric College have completed an approach or are in a position to act as a Vajra Master but in a place like a tantric college like Gyume; most monks would have done so, so it's not such a big issue. That’s generally the procedure; to act as a Vajra Master for a consecration one must complete the approach and fire puja. 
 +
 +These feast, or tsog, gatherings belong to Highest Yoga Tantra. To act as a Vajra Master for such a ceremony, the individual must have completed the approach that corresponds to the deity of that ceremony. If you have not completed this approach, which is also known as a le lung [?] or a workable retreat – it renders you suitable to perform actions, literally, and then you cannot act as a Vajra Master. ​
 +
 +This is called, conferring mandala rites without full preparation. This tantric retreat is referred to as a le lung [?] or a yam pa [?] in Tibetan, le lung [?] refers to you doing something so that you become suitable to perform activities; yam pa[?] refers to doing approach - but generally speaking, they refer to the same thing.
 +
 +In the Tibetan it says [?] there is a foot note on number 18, a pile of materials, and I had to get really creative and figure out what this meant - It’s a few spelling errors in a row, which complicated it. It’s not referring to a pile of materials at all although I did find a very similar word in the dictionary that gave Geshe-la a lot of fun. It actually refers to something in the Vinaya where a material – seeds or grains – must be made suitable. ​
 +
 +It should read: - If, during a fire puja, the fully ordained vajra holder is not mindful of the heat or does not render the seeds suitable when working with fire, it is gross violation of needlessly transgressing the two proscribed vows and two pratimoksha vows will be produced. ​
 +
 +When a fully ordained monk is doing a fire puja he should get a novice, a getsul, or a lay person – somebody who is not a fully ordained monk – to render these seeds suitable. There’s different ways; you can render them suitable with water or with fire. It's quite easy to render these seeds suitable with fire. What you do is get the novice or lay person to take two sticks of incense and light them in the fire and touch them to the grains; that’s renders them suitable to fire. We’ll have to do this for Tony when he does his fire puja. 
 +
 +This is considered a gross violation of needlessly transgressing the two proscribed vows.
 +
 +Next we move on to the section dealing with the mantra samaya. It says: - Having identified such root downfalls and gross violations, there are still samaya that need to be guarded properly. These samaya include samaya of the five families, individual and universal. What that means is samayas associated with the individual five families and those that are more general. These are not covered in the Six Session Guru Yoga. 
 +
 +They are really only referenced – mentioned briefly – in the sadhana of the Solitary Hero Vajra-Bhairava. You reach a particular section where you’re speaking about training in the pure vows, and when you go on to speaking about purely training in ethics, you reach the section in which they are referenced together. A reference is made to them, so you speak of them in a group. The first group that one would deal with are the six samayas associated with Vairochana. The Solitary Hero Vajra-Bhairava sadhana only refers to it saying, guarding the vows and samayas of the families individually and in general. ​ Dose anyone do the extensive Yamantaka sadhana? Why not?
 +
 +We’ve studied the extensive sadhana of Vajra-Bhairava in the BSP. Unless you recite this more extensive sadhana you don't really get any of that. None of it is contained in the short sadhana. Reciting the short sadhana doesn’t cover so many of the bases that were discussed in the BSP. It's really only if you are reciting the long sadhana that one really gets all the visualisations and mention of the lineages and so on and so forth. ​
 +
 +There’s different levels in meditating on the generation stage. The first one is known as the beginner’s stage; the second stage is known as the slight descent of exalted wisdom, and the next one is gaining slight control over exalted wisdom. We can chart our progress through these different stages by looking at our ability to meditate on the generation stage. There are stages you follow, beginning with taking death onto the path as the dharmakaya. In going through there, you meditate on the common protection wheel and the uncommon protection wheel and the arising of the inestimable palace and so forth. Even if you can’t get these aspects of the visualisation to arise immediately,​ if you can get them to arise clearly in stages, then you are in the category knows as the beginner – the first of these levels of a generation stage practitioner. ​
 +
 +You are still considered a beginner – why; because in training in the generation stage, you’re training so that you can get the mandala and the protection wheels to arise together in a single instant. You want them to arise instantaneously and clearly. In order to get this extensive visualisation to arise instantaneously,​ all together, you need to go in stages because it doesn’t just happen like that. First you gain proficiency by building it up in stages.  ​
 +
 +Even the protection wheel has a common and uncommon aspect. The common wheel would be fairly standard for all yidams and meditational deities; whereas the uncommon protection wheel involves sending forth the ten wrathful ones to the ten directions. There’s repeated advice that meditating on these two protection wheels is greatly beneficial to counteracting obstacles to our dharma practice.
 +
 +When you look at the brief sadhana of Yamantaka the entire visualisation of the two protection wheels and the inestimable palace and so on and so forth is covered in just two lines. They make reference to the vajra fence and a couple of other things it’s just all right there – very easy, very quick. ​
 +
 +The six samaya of Vairochana are straight forward. You should continuously abide by the three types of ethics: - the ethics of refraining from faulty conduct the ethic of gathering virtuous dharmas and the ethics of working for the benefit of sentient beings. The ethics of refraining from faulty conduct refer to refraining from the ten non-virtues,​ or guarding the vows of approaching virtue for a lay person, or guarding the vows of a novice for a monastic.
 +
 +Observing the ethics of a Bodhisattva would be considered the ethics of gathering virtuous dharma. There are things that are incompatible with the vows of a Bodhisattva;​ to guard against things, which are incompatible,​ is to gather virtuous dharma. Then we have the ethics of working for the benefit of sentient beings and so forth. ​
 +
 +You should go for refuge six times a day to the Buddha Jewel, the Dharma Jewel and the Sangha Jewel. Geshe-la is laughing for once again there’s another spelling error and doesn’t make any sense. The six samaya of Vairochana are straight forward – you have the three types of ethics, and then you have the Three Jewels to which you go for refuge six times a day. 
 +
 +Moving on, we have the samaya of Akshobya’s family, number seven: - keeping an appropriate vajra, keeping an appropriate bell, you should purify the realm of sentient beings by generating yourself into a deities form; meditate and do recitations or rely upon a action or resultant wisdom consort and make offerings to the master six times. ​
 +
 +Oftentimes we speak about the three samayas in this context, these are:- samaya of body, samaya of speech and samaya of mind. [End side a]
 +
 +The bell symbolises or represents the samaya of speech, whereas the vajra represents or symbolises the vajra of mind. Mind is the exalted wisdom of indivisible bliss and emptiness correct? So as to remind ourselves of this exalted wisdom of indivisible bliss and emptiness we keep the vajra and bell. The text mentions keeping an appropriate or qualified vajra and bell; even if you don’t have this type of vajra and bell you should have a drawing or a picture of them. The vajra is method, the bell is wisdom. ​
 +
 +The vajra is method, the bell is wisdom and you do not divorce method from wisdom and hence you have the mind samaya, the speech samaya and the body samaya – the body samaya symbolising that you should not divorce method and wisdom.
 +
 +When meditating on Six Session Guru Yoga, we visualise ourselves as Vajrasattva – doing this meditation properly fulfils these three samaya.
 +
 +To these three are added, making offerings to the master six times; this makes four.
 +
 +Six Session Guru Yoga if done properly would also fulfil this fourth one because you visualise the field of accumulation with the master as Guru Vajradhara and make offerings. If we recite Six Session Guru Yoga without any omissions, we are really fulfilling many of these samayas. Doing so helps us to avoid incurring a great number of faults. ​
 +
 +Next we have the four samayas of Ratnasambhava’s family. These are the four types of generosity: - the generosity of giving material goods, generosity of giving freedom from fear, generosity of giving dharma and generosity of giving loving- kindness. Those should be performed six times. To say that these should be performed six times daily is to say that we should work on increasing our intention to give. 
 +
 +Geshe-la couldn’t remember the preceding line but in Six Session Guru Yoga it makes mention of giving without any sense of loss. 
 +
 +These four samaya of Ratnasambhava’s family are quite easy aren’t they.
 +
 +Geshe-la is referring to section B4: - From this moment on without any sense of loss I send forth my body and likewise my wealth.
 +
 +We go on to the three samayas of Amitabha’s family, which are: - you should uphold the following six times; the outer classes of tantra, action and performance;​ the secret classes of tantra, yoga and highest yoga; and the hearer’s and solitary realiser’s and perfection vehicles. ​
 +
 +In the ceremony of taking the vows there’s a very similar statement, it speaks about upholding the outer, inner, secret and the three vehicles. As is very typical in some of these verses, the statements are made in brief so it's just outer, inner and three vehicles. It just says outer, inner and the three vehicles – what does outer refer to? It refers to the outer classes of tantra – action and performance tantra. What does secret refer to? It refers to the secret classes of tantra – yoga tantra and Highest Yoga Tantra. Then it mentions three vehicles, which refers to the Hearer’s Solitary Realiser’s and Perfection vehicle. ​
 +
 +If we were to count each of these individually,​ separating action from performance and yoga from highest yoga we would have seven – a lot more than just three. Action 1. Performance 2. Yoga 3. Highest Yoga 4. Hearer’s; Solitary Realiser’s and Perfection Vehicle = 7, each of these counted as one. 
 +
 +There are two samaya of Amoghasiddhi’s family. The first is: - you should promise to exert yourself with as much strength you can muster in making outer, inner, secret and suchness offerings to all; make offerings six times throughout the day and night. There are only two samayas associated with Amoghasiddhi’s family. Do you know what outer offerings refer to? They refer to the offerings that we make when we recite argham, padyam and so on and so forth. Inner offerings are usually called inner offerings. ​
 +
 +Inner offerings are the five meats and the five nectars. We take these offerings and we do the three actions on them, which is to purify, transform and increase, and are symbolised by the three syllables, om ah hung. You purify, transform and increase into an ocean of exalted wisdom nectar. ​
 +
 +That should be sufficient for the inner offering. The secret offering refers to entering into union with the exalted wisdom consort. In doing so, you manifest the innate bliss and this is the secret offering. Utilising that innate bliss to ascertain emptiness, is the suchness offering. These are the outer, inner, secret and suchness offerings that we find in Guru Puja as well.
 +
 +You promise to exert yourself with as much strength as you can muster. Actually number 19 is making offerings six times throughout the day and night. You should promise to exert yourself with as much strength as you can muster in making outer, inner, secret and suchness offerings to all – number 18. Number 19 is making offerings to all six times throughout the day and night.
 +
 +With the pride of being Vajrasattva I embrace my consort Bhagavati while holding vajra and bell, symbolic of the secret of great bliss simultaneous with the secret of voidness free from the mental fabrication of true existence. ​
 +
 +From this moment on without any sense of loss, I send forth my body, and likewise my wealth, and my virtues amassed throughout the three times, in order to help all beings, my mothers. ​
 +
 +This also includes this line that Geshe-la was referring to earlier, giving without any sense of loss.
 +
 +That’s the nineteen vows – the samaya.
 +
 +Student. Inaudible and not repeated my Ven. Lozang Zopa.
 +Geshe-la. You referred to the verses that we recite when we actually take these vows in an empowerment. In that verse that we recite, the [?] to completely guard all vows, here we have an alternate explanation.
 +Completely guarding all vows, refers to guarding the vows of individual liberation, the vows of a Bodhisattva and the vows of mantra. If you’ve taken the vows of mantra then it's necessarily the case that you have also taken the vows of a Bodhisattva because they follow in succession of one another. According to the same reasoning, you’ve, almost without exception; have the vows of individual liberation. For you go for refuge, you take the vows of refuge and you are going to take some of the vows of approaching virtue at the very least. If you have the vows of mantra, it's almost without exception that you say you’ve had the vows of a Bodhisattva and the vows of individual liberation as well.
 +
 +It says in this text that we have here; 18. You should promise to exert yourself with as much strength as you can mister in making outer, inner, secret and suchness offerings to all. It doesn’t actually say 19, but it says that there are two of Amoghasiddhi’s and the only alternative for number 2 would be making offerings six times throughout the day and night. Geshe-la reckons they are all included within this. 
 +
 +Geshe-la is referring to the fact that we have a section immediately following the 19 samayas that says, in brief. Taken altogether, these 19 samayas amount to: - abiding in the samayas of arousing the mind of enlightenment;​ holding all vows without exception for the benefit of sentient beings; liberating those who have not been liberated from the disturbing emotions; freeing those who have not been freed from the obscurations to knowledge; giving breath to those who are suffocating under the suffering of the lower realms and so forth, and establishing sentient beings in nirvana. ​
 +
 +This is quite the same as the nineteen samayas of the five families. This is,in some ways, a paraphrase of the verse that we recite when we take the vows. You speak about liberating those who are not liberated; what does that refer to? It refers to liberating those who have not been liberated from the disturbing emotions. After that you say, freeing those who have not been freed, which refers to freeing those who have not been freed from the obscurations to knowledge. Then, giving breath to those who have no breath, who are suffocating;​ giving breath to those who are suffocating under the suffering of the lower realms and so forth. Establishing sentient beings in nirvana, which should be understood as establishing sentient beings in non-abiding nirvana. In doing so, we should abide by all the vows and samayas.
 +
 +Secondly the universal samaya of the five families include root samaya and secondary samaya. First, the way to guard the root samaya: - Six times a day, three times during the day and three times during the night, review the downfalls etc and examine your continuum to see whether or not you have incurred any root downfalls or downfalls of the gross violation – or see if any have arisen. If you find that such a root downfall or gross violation has been incurred, repair it through fierce regret. If such violations have not been incurred then cultivate joy. Effort should be made so that the downfalls and so forth do not arise even though your life be endangered. If you fail to do these things in any one of the six times you incur a gross violation, so show off your resolve in each of the six times.
 +
 +Secondly the secondary branch samaya includes the samaya of giving, the samaya of reliance and teaching others the samaya of abandonment. 1. To abandon the four root vows and the one pertaining to intoxicants,​ are wrong actions. I must perform for the benefit of taming sentient beings. You should endeavour to abandon all improper actions. ​
 +
 +The four root vows refer to 1. Taking life, particularly that of a human; 2. Taking what is not given. 3. Committing sexual misconduct. 4. Making a great lie – pretence to higher qualities. You can add to that the fifth vow which relates to taking intoxicants.
 +
 +It seems that one is not permitted to drink alcohol needlessly, even if one is a practitioner of mantra. Drinking alcohol without reason doesn’t seem to be permitted. ​
 +
 +Last week Geshe-la mentioned the three recognitions that one is supposed to adopt when entering into union with a consort. One of which is the thought that I am entering into union so that I can develop uncontaminated bliss in this lifetime, which puts a different spin on things. Clearly there is a very specific purpose to the act. It seems that a similar thing might apply to the taking of meat and alcohol. It's more permissible to partake of meat and alcohol when one is doing so with the recognition that it is in order to give rise to uncontaminated bliss. This is quite different to being attached to alcohol or being attached to a female or a male and engaging in intercourse. The basic purpose behind the acts are quite different; one out of attachment, one to develop uncontaminated bliss. ​
 +
 +It's a fault to be attached to the pleasures of cyclic existence; it obstructs the intention to definitely emerge. So then, to enter into union out of attachment to the contaminated pleasures or to drink alcohol out of attachment to contaminated pleasures is also a fault isn’t it. It's not accurate for a lay person, a householder,​ to say ‘we don’t need to bother about guarding those things; we don’t have those vows’. It seems that there is a fault for a householder thinking they don’t need to guard against those things. Basically, when it comes right down to it, it doesn’t seem that householders are permitted to drink alcohol either. I’m not going to make any more problems – I’ll leave it there. ​
 +
 +If you think about it in this way you can see what Geshe-la is driving at. We speak so highly of the intention to definitely emerge, renunciation;​ we speak about how important it is to develop this intention to definitely emerge. If it's so important, then those things that hinder it are faulty – aren’t’ they. Attachment to contaminated pleasures is obviously a hindrance, so wouldn’t those things that encourage that be faults. It might appear that Geshe-la is just saying this because he’s a monk, but he’s not just saying it because he’s a monk. Monks and nuns are genuinely turning their backs on one of the greatest contaminated pleasures and taking a step down the path to definite emergence – aren’t they? Householders speak about the intention to definitely emerge and perhaps even try to cultivate it, but they haven’t yet taken a step have they. [Geshe-la laughs] there are very few of us tonight, so Geshe-la is speaking a bit playfully. Geshe-la really feels that being a monk or nun is a good thing, worth taking that step – jumping up on the first stair, if we don't fall down.
 +
 +There does seem to be certain faults attached to the craving after and grasping at the contaminated pleasures, particularly for lay people. That’s the samaya of giving and the samaya of reliance. Geshe-la has pointed out that he is not really comfortable with the wording of the Tibetan text, it’s not really entirely clear if it  should be translated as giving due to the prevalence of spelling errors it is difficult to tell – the wording is fine, it's just the title. ​
 +
 +The samaya of reliance, rely on a holy guru. Serve, revere and make offerings to yogis; make effort to abide by the ethics of abandoning the ten non-virtues.
 +
 +Rather than teaching others the samaya of abandonments it should probably read: - teaching the other samayas of abandoning – it's a reference to abandoning other activities. You should not seek to progress through the Hinayana paths, neither should you pray for nor be attached to the attainment of its results, Nirvana; delight in working for sentient beings regardless of the difficulties. ​
 +
 +Don the armour of working for sentient beings until samsara is empty. Do not belittle yakshas be they in the form of humans, non-humans or any secret form [the secret form is the form of the yakshas], do not step over something that directly depicts the symbolic form of a deity [ a statue or it's mount] or something that reflects them, which is like a picture; nor should you step over something that depicts the lamas mount or a deity’s hand implements; do not step over leftovers such as the old food, flowers or water that has been offered to deities; nor should you step over the shadow of a deity’s image, the lama or a stupa; should it prove difficult to avoid stepping over such things, then say vajra beka akrama [? No text sorry!!] and, saying this mantra, imagine that you are passing under them. 
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 +Guard these individual and general samaya by recounting them in this way.
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 +A bit of time is going to lapse before we come together again. In parting, Geshe-la would say that it would be good if from time to time we could recite the longer sadhana and when we get the time to review, read through, the various vows and samayas as well, as we are advised in this text. Thank you.
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six-session_guru_yoga_commentary_geshe_tashi_tsering_of_chenrezig_institute_17.txt · Last modified: 2018/02/26 18:13 (external edit)